Mark Beasley

  • “Rock–Paper–Scissors: Pop Music as Subject of Visual Art”

    For his take on the subject at Kunsthaus Graz, pop-culture theorist Diedrich Diederichsen will forgo easy categorizations to highlight idiosyncracies in this show’s disparate collection of videos, paintings, drawings, and installations by sixteen artists informed by music.

    As recent historical exhibitions attest—notably P.S. 1’s 2006 “Music Is a Better Noise” and the Barbican’s “Panic Attack!” in 2007—art and pop music have been creative bedfellows for many a year. Despite encroaching middle-age spread, they are repeatedly called on to do a dance of high and low culture for the gallery masses. For his take on the subject at Kunsthaus Graz, pop-culture theorist Diedrich Diederichsen will forgo easy categorizations to highlight idiosyncracies in this show’s disparate collection of videos, paintings, drawings, and installations by

  • “Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967”

    Avoiding simple “cock rock” homage, the show features contributions by a number of female artists—Jutta Koether, Aleksandra Mir, and Linder Sterling, among others.

    “Please allow me to introduce myself,” squawked Mick Jagger in 1968, and forty years later our love affair with that two-backed beast born of man and guitar—rock ’n’ roll—still burns strong. Spanning those four decades, with art by more than sixty artists from four continents—including Richard Hamilton’s collage Swingeing London 67, 1968–69, and Dan Graham’s seminal video Rock My Religion, 1982–84—this survey of some 125 works shows that rock, with its meretricious cousin pop, contains a lexicon of politics and style coded in mere glances and swaggers. Avoiding simple “