Matthew Carlson

  • picks May 24, 2019

    Jean-Luc Moulène

    Jean-Luc Moulène’s new sculpture sits in a room like an unearthed piece of technology from the future. To think of its weight, one might consider the epigraph from Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1979 film Stalker: “What was it? A meteorite that fell to Earth? Or a visitation from outer space?” For More or Less Bone (Formal Topological Optimization) (Paris–NY, 2018–19), Moulène collaborated with France’s Aerospace Valley, a civilian and military aircraft engineering cluster, to render an optimal form that amalgamates a set of various shapes: spheres, stairs, and human knuckles. This seemingly random fusion,

  • interviews February 08, 2019

    Nathaniel Dorsky

    Nathaniel Dorsky treats celluloid as a medium for ceremony—silence and light are concerns he has explored in his films since the 1960s. His latest work, Colophon (for the Arboretum Cycle) (2018), will screen at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in California on February 9, 2019.The entire Arboretum Cycle, which comprises seven films shot in the San Francisco Arboretum between 2017 and 2018, will also screen there on February 15, 2019.

    THERE WAS A DROUGHT IN CALIFORNIA for five years, and then in the autumn of 2017 there was a huge amount of rain. I went to the San Francisco Arboretum

  • film December 07, 2018

    The State He’s In

    German filmmaker Christian Petzold may be cinema’s foremost melodramatist—an auteur, but for the people. For three decades, he has borrowed from various genres––most noticeably, film noir––to ask questions about labor, love, and systems of oppression. Here, Artforum’s Matthew Carlson talks with Petzold about his career, now a focus of a retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center that runs through December 13, 2018. The retrospective, titled “The State We Are In,” includes his early student work, his collaborations with Harun Farocki, a small selection of films that have influenced

  • interviews October 08, 2018

    Karl Ove Knausgaard

    This past September, the final installment of Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle book series (Archipelago, 2012–18) was internationally released. Now, he has written a forthcoming book on Edvard Munch, So Much Longing in So Little Space (Penguin, 2019). “Towards the Forest,” an exhibition he curated at the Munch Museum in Oslo in 2017, is the subject of Joachim and Emil Trier’s film The Other Munch (2018), which explores the painter’s life and work through dialogues about it with Knausgaard

    (())[[I WROTE A BOOK ABOUT EDVARD MUNCH’S PAINTINGS and how people relate to him today,