Matthew Jesse Jackson

  • “Joseph Beuys: Appeal for an Alternative”

    The first major Joseph Beuys exhibition in Moscow proposes the artist’s work as a site of inveterate turbulence, a hodgepodge of visceral didacticism, and calls for social transformation that serially engages the East within the West. In Beuys’s art-life cosmology, Russia is the hulking Eurasian landmass of energy and potential, the great unknown variable in the equation of Western civilization. Bringing together literally—literally!—hundreds of works and ephemera, “Appeal for an Alternative” includes such seminal installations as The End of the Twentieth Century

  • “Nedko Solakov: All in Order, with Exceptions”

    The Bulgarian artist Nedko Solakov has been orchestrating scenes of viscerally absurd contradiction since he first emerged as an artist around 1980.

    The Bulgarian artist Nedko Solakov has been orchestrating scenes of viscerally absurd contradiction since he first emerged as an artist around 1980. For example, in Top Secret, he presented a wooden box of index cards explicitly detailing his own collaboration, as a youth, with the communist secret police—a shockingly brazen admission for a newly post-Soviet nation in 1990, when the work was first shown. Now, for his first major solo exhibition in the UK, Solakov presents a single “best” work from each year of his production. However—and, given his taste for paradox,

  • “Irina Nakhova: Rooms”

    The Moscow Conceptual Circle was the postwar Soviet Union’s most significant artistic phenomenon—and a boys’ club. Practically the only woman to navigate the circle’s male-bonding rituals, Irina Nakhova has produced a wildly heterogeneous body of installations, paintings, and sculptures since the mid-1970s. Her groundbreaking Rooms, a five-part apartment installation first constructed in the early ’80s, disarticulated normative domestic spatial relationships, creating awkward, oddly revelatory juxtapositions of sensory information. If embarked on today, such a

  • Mladen Stilinović

    Over nearly four decades, the Belgrade-born, Zagreb-based Mladen Stilinović has engaged in obsessive, lo-fi gestures that channel the competing multiethnic, quasi-socialist sensibilities of his birthplace, the former Yugoslavia, its 1991 dissolution having neatly bisected his career.

    Over nearly four decades, the Belgrade-born, Zagreb-based Mladen Stilinović has engaged in obsessive, lo-fi gestures that channel the competing multiethnic, quasi-socialist sensibilities of his birthplace, the former Yugoslavia, its 1991 dissolution having neatly bisected his career. This ambitious retrospective will feature many of his best-known installations, collages, artist’s books, and photographs, including Artist at Work, 1978 (several snapshots of Stilinović in repose), and the English-language banner that reads as it is titled, An Artist

  • “The Quick and the Dead”

    From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.

    —The Apostles’ Creed

    CONCEPTUAL ART, it could be said, gravitates toward either deductive or productive gestures. Deductive Conceptualism, as I’m calling it, concentrates on the conditions and procedures that allow artworks to be recognized as such—or, in the terms of painting talk, “the internal structure of the picture is deduced from the shape of the support,” to quote Yve-Alain Bois recapitulating Michael Fried on Frank Stella. By better understanding itself, deductive Conceptualism proposes to better understand the world. Artists