Meghan Dailey

  • Landscape Confection

    The Wexner has aptly billed “Landscape Confection” as “whimsical and vividly colorful,” but with artists like Kori Newkirk, Michael Raedecker, and Lisa Sanditz in the mix, the show also promises some slightly unsettling moments. About fifty works by thirteen artists relate, in varying degrees of representation, to the landscape.

    The Wexner has aptly billed “Landscape Confection” as “whimsical and vividly colorful,” but with artists like Kori Newkirk, Michael Raedecker, and Lisa Sanditz in the mix, the show also promises some slightly unsettling moments. About fifty works by thirteen artists—including Pia Fries's bright, topographical abstractions and Rowena Dring's stitched-by-numbers “paintings”—relate, in varying degrees of representation, to the landscape. All evidence the allure and durability of this ancient subject. The catalogue features an essay by Helen Molesworth and entries

  • Atsuko Tanaka

    “Make it new” was the mandate of Gutaï, a pioneering collective in postwar Japan. The dictum was realized emphatically in many of the group’s performance works, such as Kazuo Shiraga’s Challenge to the Mud, 1955, in which the artist writhed in a pile of slop, creating a constantly shifting live informe sculpture that made Pollock’s rhythmic pouring and dripping seem positively genteel. In another radical act, Atsuko Tanaka donned a potentially dangerous costume of tangled cords and brightly painted incandescent bulbs that lit up with the flick of a switch. Like Shiraga’s mud encounter, Electric

  • Amedeo Modigliani

    After decades of revisionist art history, with its accompanying tendency to downplay the significance of biography, it’s hard to believe that the oeuvre of Amedeo Modigliani remains colored by accounts of personal tragedy. Perhaps the most famous of the Montparnasse peintres maudits, Modigliani’s life story is familiar enough: Impoverished, itinerant, tubercular but handsome, the artist was frequently under the influence of alcohol and drugs, sketched café clients for money, and died at the age of thirty-five (an event immediately followed by the suicide of his pregnant girlfriend and last muse,

  • E.V. Day

    For her taut and tart sculptural work, E.V. Day has taken women’s undergarments off the body and into the realm of art.

    For her taut and tart sculptural work, E.V. Day has taken women’s undergarments off the body and into the realm of art. Stretching nylon and silk both physically and conceptually, she’s used thongs and G-strings to create formations suggestive of jet planes or birds, employed crotchless panties and chicken eggs in a reproductive allegory, and made her own version of Winged Victory from monofil-ament and a shredded red sequined dress. Do these works “suggest the possibility of an active female pleas-ure,” as the press release claims? Viewers can draw their own conclusion from a new commission

  • Shahzia Sikander

    Pakistan-born Shahzia Sikander re-interprets the tradition of Mughal miniature painting for a contemporary eye, fluidly combining Christian, Hindu, Muslim, and American pop-cultural iconography within a single image.

    Pakistan-born Shahzia Sikander re-interprets the tradition of Mughal miniature painting for a contemporary eye, fluidly combining Christian, Hindu, Muslim, and American pop-cultural iconography within a single image. Her jewel-like paintings and drawings and deft fusion of cultural and visual elements make for an arresting body of work; but more than that, Sikander puts relevance and meaning back into shopworn "multiculturalism.” The second half of an exhibition that appeared at Skidmore College’s Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery earlier this year, this show features fifty new works on paper,

  • Erick Swenson

    At least since his 1998 show at Dallas’s Angstrom Gallery, Erick Swenson has pursued a level of presentation and craftsmanship so exacting that it might attract phone calls equally from museum curators and from Hollywood special-effects technicians. Titled “Obviously a Movie,” the Angstrom show consisted of sculpted creatures, including a creepy half-horse, half-sheep called Edgar, 1997, that stood upright and two green-faced ape-men set in action poses among snow-covered rocks, all dusted with artificial snow. Making no secret of their artifice and sources, Swenson’s hybrid forms appear almost

  • Cheyney Thompson

    One might not guess that one of Louisiana-born, New York–based artist Cheyney Thompson’s inspirations is Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin. But, starting with his 2002 exhibition “1 Scenario + 1 Situation,” also at this gallery, the artist has hoped that viewers might respond to his series of small paintings of building materials as they once did to the contemplative boy building a house of cards. With his carefully realized depictions of bricks and two-by-fours floating alone or in elegant yet uncategorizable combinations, Thompson wants to spur the viewer toward a moment of crystal-clear apprehension

  • Kai Althoff

    Tormented, sweet, angry, expressionistic, nostalgic, utterly contemporary—Kai Althoff’s eclectic artwork is all that and more.

    Tormented, sweet, angry, expressionistic, nostalgic, utterly contemporary—Kai Althoff’s eclectic artwork is all that and more. The Cologne-based artist is known on American shores mostly for watercolors and oils that evoke nineteenth-century German history, folklore, and Biedermeier genre scenes or, in darker moments, the baleful narratives of George Grosz. But Althoff’s first survey at a US museum includes over 140 works in a range of media from the past twenty-five years: paintings, photography, works on paper, installations, and videos, as well as audio presentation

  • LAYING IT ON THICK: THE ART OF DANA SCHUTZ

    AS A PAINTER WHO IS ADVANCING ON THE SHEER FORCE OF ECSTATIC IMAGINATION, ideation, and subjective color, Dana Schutz just might be our finest contemporary symbolist. In the simplest terms, Schutz gives form to things that do not exist outside of art, and her paintings would seem to avail themselves of the artist’s right—so eloquently articulated in Gabriel-Albert Aurier’s celebrated 1891 essay “Symbolism in Painting: Paul Gauguin”—to exaggerate, attenuate, or deform an object’s qualities not merely in furtherance of his individual vision but in service of the “needs of the Idea to be expressed.”

  • William Pope.L

    Over the course of two decades of confrontational performance work, William Pope.L has used his body to probe race, desire, endurance, and deprivation. Once you see one of his projects, you’re not likely to forget it—although it’s possible you might not recognize it as art. For Tompkins Square Crawl, 1991, the artist, dressed in a business suit and awkwardly holding a tiny flowerpot, laboriously crawled on his stomach around the East Village park. (The sight of a black man intentionally lying in the gutter confused and enraged one onlooker so much that he called the police.) Skewering everything

  • Manny Farber

    Manny Farber’s paintings are often written about in the context of his seminal film criticism, as if the significance and iconoclasm of his output in one medium is necessarily related to his equally inimitable production in another. But familiarity with his essays, which were published from the ’40s to the mid-’70s (a collection of the writing was reissued in 1998), is not required to get caught up in Farber’s art. The fact is, before the writing or the painting came the looking, and Farber looks and sees like nobody else. This is amply clear in “About Face,” a career overview of the

  • Dan Fischer

    Dan Fischer’s art of homage and appropriation reveals its maker as both passionate fan and savvy practitioner. Well-known photographs of artists and artworks are the originals for Fischer’s detailed graphite-on-paper copies; his recent show included dozens of variations on twentieth-century portraiture, including Cindy Sherman in an untitled film still; Piero Manzoni grinning and holding a can of Artist’s Shit; Robert Gober nearly unrecognizable in a wedding gown; Piet Mondrian in his tidy smock calmly regarding a grid painting; and Jean-Michel Basquiat sitting on one of his crate constructions.

  • Vivienne Westwood

    God save the queen—of fashion, that is.

    God save the queen—of fashion, that is. Ever since she and Malcolm McLaren swung open the doors of their London boutique Let it Rock in 1971, the name Vivienne Westwood has been synonymous with British style. This retrospective of about 150 works from the ’70s to the present is the most complete to date: It covers everything from the punk T-shirts she created for the Sex Pistols to her latest high-concept runway shows. The V&A has long accumulated Westwood’s designs, and she has gleefully pillaged their collection of historical dress as inspiration for her outrageous

  • Júlia Ventura

    Júlia Ventura has been a steady presence in the Netherlands, where she lives, and in her native Portugal, but she’s less known outside Europe. One wonders why, given the length of her career and the potency of her photographs.

    Júlia Ventura has been a steady presence in the Netherlands, where she lives, and in her native Portugal (this is her second show at the Fundação de Serralves), but she’s less known outside Europe. One wonders why, given the length of her career (over twenty years) and the potency of her photographs; in a piercing self-portrait from 1985 Ventura snarls slightly, holding a blooming rose in one hand and making a fist with the other. That work and about sixty others from 1982 to the present are on view. The catalogue boasts contributions by curator Christian Bernard as

  • Luisa Lambri

    Luisa Lambri’s elegant, often monochromatic photographs of isolated architectural details like facades, corridors, and venetian blind–covered windows could represent any number of buildings anywhere.

    Luisa Lambri’s elegant, often monochromatic photographs of isolated architectural details like facades, corridors, and venetian blind–covered windows could represent any number of buildings anywhere. That they are always untitled adds to the mystery. But Lambri is engaged in a dialogue with the iconic, not the anonymous—the subjects of her photographic investigations include Corbusier, Niemeyer, and Neutra. And now Philip Johnson: A photograph of the Houston residence he designed for John and Dominique de Menil was commissioned on the occasion of this solo exhibition,

  • Jean Arp

    Arp’s abstract reliefs and collages may not have upended the bourgeois, but they were certainly conducive to a formal revolution.

    In Europe in 1915, making art was nothing less than staging a revolt: As Jean Arp later wrote remembering those heady days in Zurich, “While the thunder of the batteries rumbled in the distance . . . we aspired to a new order that might restore the balance between heaven and hell.” Arp’s abstract reliefs and collages may not have upended the bourgeois, but they were certainly conducive to a formal revolution. Independent curator Maria Lluïsa Borràs has revamped the checklist of her 2001 Arp show at Barcelona’s Fundació Joan Miró, bringing Belgium its first-ever

  • Senga Nengudi

    In the ’70s and ’80s Senga Nengudi was at the forefront of the African-American avant-garde in Los Angeles and New York. Along with artists like David Hammons and Suzanne Jackson, she exhibited at Linda Goode Bryant’s Just Above Midtown, or JAM, Gallery, which was the first African American–run space in the Fifty-seventh Street area. (Before closing in the mid-’80s, Bryant also introduced Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Lorna Simpson, and Fred Wilson to a New York audience.) Nengudi caused quite a buzz with her JAM solo debut: a group of nylon-stocking works called “Répondez S’il Vous Plait

  • Philippe Parreno

    In December 2002, Philippe Parreno and Pierre Huyghe retired Annlee, the Japanese anime character they’d bought the rights to in 1999 and who’d embodied personalities, narratives, and ideas for them and a slew of other artists. Her final incarnation as a fireworks display—sad-eyed head-and-shoulders only—took place at an art fair, the perfect place for a commercially acquired icon to bid us adieu.

    But it’s hard to imagine such a useful tool (or “shell,” as Annlee was called, and gloomily called herself ) disappearing completely. And because repetition with alteration is a constant in Parreno’s

  • Carlo Mollino

    Carlo Mollino earned his place in the history of design long ago. Lately, however, his idiosyncratic interiors have been discussed less than his stash of nearly 1,500 erotic photographs found in a drawer after his death. Who knew this eccentric modern had a passion for hookers and Polaroids? In this exhibition, about twenty photos of dolled-up and carefully posed Turinese prostitutes taken by Mollino himself were encased in deeply recessed frames that suggested tiny windows onto the mind of a pervy romantic.

    Mollino (1905–73), the son of a prominent engineer, studied architecture, then engineering,

  • The Last Picture Show: Artists Using Photography, 1960–1982

    Is this show—with forty artists, 100 works, an extensive catalogue, and a great title—Walker curator Douglas Fogle’s follow-up to his “Painting at the Edge of the World”?

    Is this show—with forty artists, 100 works, an extensive catalogue, and a great title—Walker curator Douglas Fogle’s follow-up to his “Painting at the Edge of the World”? That exhibition explored the way artists used paint not in the manner of traditional painters but to see what it could do. Likewise, the exploitation of photography’s potential as a tool in the ’60s and ’70s pushed the medium in the direction of Conceptualism; pure aesthetics gave way to the Bechers, Baldessari, and the Pictures artists, not to mention explorations of identity, performativity, and the postindustrial