Michael Archer

  • Michel François, Hand on Map, 2008.

    Michel François

    As a coda to “Faux Jumeux”—Michel François’s yearlong curatorial project for SMAK—the Belgian artist will stage a survey of his own work.

    As a coda to “Faux Jumeux”—Michel François’s yearlong curatorial project for SMAK—the Belgian artist will stage a survey of his own work. Throughout his career, François has repeated forms and recombined work, pursuing themes across several exhibitions, such that his practice might best be described as a long-term, rhizomatic exploration of sculptural possibility. His first major survey brings together some fifty heterogeneous pieces made since the late 1980s, promising a good overview of this evolving sculptural lexicon and of the interrelated

  • Richard Long, Circle in Africa, 1978.

    Richard Long

    Curators Helen Little and Clarrie Wallis have assembled about eighty of Long’s stone sculptures, expansive mud wall drawings, photographs, and text-based pieces to trace the development of his practice, from early, iconic land interventions to new work.

    Following hard on the heels of Long’s 2007 Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art survey, this major retrospective is the artist’s first large-scale show in London in nearly twenty years. Curators Helen Little and Clarrie Wallis have assembled about eighty of Long’s stone sculptures, expansive mud wall drawings, photographs, and text-based pieces to trace the development of his practice, from early, iconic land interventions such as A Line Made by Walking, 1967, to new work. Significantly, the venue—Tate Britain, as opposed to Tate Modern—could lead

  • Sarah Morris, Beijing, 2008, still from a color film in 35 mm, 86 minutes.

    Sarah Morris

    Sarah Morris’s exploration of the elaborate conversation between architecture and power can be found most recently in her sequence of paintings and films concerned with the Olympic Games.

    Sarah Morris’s exploration of the elaborate conversation between architecture and power can be found most recently in her sequence of paintings and films concerned with the Olympic Games. In addition to this show’s substantial group of paintings, an extensive, site-specific wall work, and two other films from the past decade, the Museum für Moderne Kunst—in conjunction with Italy’s Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna, which is presenting a concurrent survey exhibition of the artist’s work—will co-premiere Morris’s feature-length film Beijing, 2008,

  • Ray Johnson

    A decade and a half after his death, Ray Johnson continues to occupy the marginal yet thoroughly involved position he held in life. The growing list of exhibitions and writings about his work serves to clarify rather than alter our understanding of the deliberate distance he maintained from the mechanisms of the art market, heightening our appreciation of the perspicacity with which he observed those workings. His conflicts with the fixed ideas of what constitutes an artist’s career have only gained in significance with time.

    Johnson’s reliance on the postal system as a means to share his ideas

  • Jimmie Durham, He said I was always juxtaposing. . . , 2005, mixed media, dimensions variable.

    “Jimmie Durham: Rejected Stones”

    Jimmie Durham insists that we take nothing for granted. Language, objects, institutions—the base elements that constitute “the way things are”—are all held up to scrutiny, only to show us that things are also always some other way, too.

    Jimmie Durham insists that we take nothing for granted. Language, objects, institutions—the base elements that constitute “the way things are”—are all held up to scrutiny, only to show us that things are also always some other way, too. With disarming humor but utter penetrative seriousness, he proffers (to paraphrase the artist) “interruptions to authoritative history,” the effect of which is to put everything into question, even the ground on which we stand. Where and what is Western art? And is “postcolonial” too glib a term to describe our present

  • Matti Braun, S.R., 2003, mixed media. Installation view, Kunstverein Freiburg, Germany.

    Matti Braun

    The visually sensitive, materially diverse results of Matti Braun’s investigations into the notion of cultural difference reveal the misperceptions, category errors, and semantic slippages that occur when the productive relations of one context are viewed through the aesthetic spectacles of another.

    The visually sensitive, materially diverse results of Matti Braun’s investigations into the notion of cultural difference reveal the misperceptions, category errors, and semantic slippages that occur when the productive relations of one context are viewed through the aesthetic spectacles of another. In what will be Braun’s first major museum show, small, independently conceived pieces from throughout his career will accompany large-scale installations from six recent series, including “S.R.” and “The Alien”—both of which take on Satyajit Ray’s abandoned project

  • Sarah Morris

    Tommie Smith and John Carlos changed my life. Beamed in monochrome from Mexico City to a white boy in the nowhere provinces of England in 1968, the athletes’ silent gesture of graceful resistance under pressure—raising their fists in a black power salute at the Olympic medal ceremony—spoke loudly of the power of images to signify politically, economically, and ideologically. The Olympics matter. Four years later, everyone’s eyes were on Munich when a hooded member of the Palestinian Black September group peered over the balcony of an apartment in the athletes’ village. Inside were eleven Israeli

  • Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Jean Cocteau (detail), 2003–2006, mixed media, dimensions variable.

    Marc Camille Chaimowicz

    Marc Camille Chaimowicz's work comes in many guises, from paintings and sculptures to wallpaper designs, furniture, and much else besides, but this exhibition is anything but a one-person show.

    Marc Camille Chaimowicz's work comes in many guises, from paintings and sculptures to wallpaper designs, furniture, and much else besides, but this exhibition is anything but a one-person show. As its title, “. . . In the Cherished Company of Others . . . (1648–2036),” suggests, Chaimowicz is exhibiting in company with artists whose work he admires, including Tom Burr, James Lee Byars, Michael Krebber, Gerrit Rietveld, Elsa Schiaparelli, and an anonymous seventeenth-century jeweler. His Cocteau Room (Jean Cocteau, 2003–2006), a complex homage involving a dozen other

  • OPENINGS: KARLA BLACK

    THERE ARE MANY TERMS in the lexicon of not quite: tentative, provisional, diffident. None of these describe Karla Black. To be sure, there is a natural fragility to her base materials (brown paper, sugar paper, cellophane, glass, polyethylene), and much that she applies to their surfaces is amorphous (chalk and plaster dust, petroleum jelly, makeup, foot spray, hair spray). But the spatial command of her work is authoritative. This has been so from the start of Black’s career, when she focused on performance. I first encountered her at this stage, at the end of the 1990s; she was a student at

  • Juan Muñoz, Conversation Piece (detail), 1996, dimensions variable. Photo: Luis Asin Image.

    Juan Muñoz

    Juan Muñoz, who died prematurely just a few weeks after his installation Double Bind opened in Tate Modern's Turbine Hall in 2001, described his activity as that of a storyteller.

    Juan Muñoz, who died prematurely just a few weeks after his installation Double Bind opened in Tate Modern's Turbine Hall in 2001, described his activity as that of a storyteller. Inspired by a deep curiosity about the world, his work too many forms—illusionistic perspectives of patterned floors; chalk drawings of rooms and doorways; balconies providing a detached, but still engaged, viewpoint; statues of dwarfs, prompters to the play of life; sound works; performances; and, of course, those conversational groups of figures with laughing Chinese faces. The full range

  • Eva Rothschild

    The advance notice was striking: The gallery’s tabloid-style newsletter featured a set of images in which individuals stand against a gallery wall holding snakes. Sometimes fondling the creatures, sometimes wearing them entwined around their arms or necks like exotic jewelry, the human subjects look entirely comfortable with their seductive, intimate, and potentially murderous companions. “Here,” Eva Rothschild seems to be saying with her photographs, “this is what I do.” The snakes are like simple, abstract lines, folding and refolding, moving from one to two to three dimensions. In this regard,

  • Tue Greenfort, Flexible Weihnachtsbaum-Einsammlung (Flexible Christmas Tree Collection), 2005, wall text, christmas trees, dimensions vary.

    Tue Greenfort

    In Berlin-based artist Tue Greenfort's projects, conceptual and critical works—appropriated and subtly reengineered—crop up in “new” forms.

    In its engagement with current socioeconomic and environmental conditions, Berlin-based artist Tue Greenfort’s practice strikes an impish balance between consumption and conservation. In his projects, conceptual and critical works—appropriated and subtly reengineered—crop up in “new” forms: In 2005, Greenfort re-presented Hans Haacke’s 1963–65 Condensation Cube, now made with water bottled by Coca-Cola; his use of oversize exhibition captions echoes Lawrence Weiner’s wall texts; a melted plastic jug set on a gallery floor evokes Richard Serra’s molten Splashing of 1968.