Michael Archer

  • Josef Kramhöller

    The colors in Josef Kramhöller’s photographs are gorgeous: Deep reds, golds, yellows, they hold the promise of something very special—if only one could get things in focus. Even the blacks are luscious, but everything is a blur. In one photograph, there’s a hint of a jewelry display, but other than that the eye finds little to grasp. A closer look, however, reveals that the center of each photograph is, in fact, precisely in focus: a single fingerprint left by the artist on the window of one of London’s more exclusive West End shops. Laid out before us, the goods on display nevertheless remain

  • Richard Long

    Though Richard Long is often referred to as a practitioner of Land art, this tag can be misleading. His focus on the physical and perceptual relationships that develop from an individual’s presence in and passage through the landscape marks out his practice as quite distinct from that of his US contemporaries, such as Walter De Maria and Robert Smithson: For Long, the human scale remains key, both temporally and spatially. This retrospective will give prominence to Long’s Scottish walks and works, complemented by recent driftwood sculptures, new large-scale mud

  • Imi Knoebel

    As its name implies, the Henry Moore Institute is dedicated to the display and study of sculpture. All the more intriguing, therefore, to find it staging an exhibition of work by Imi Knoebel. Despite the fact that it extends so often into three dimensions, Knoebel’s work—like that of Blinky Palermo, his fellow student at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf—is implacably that of a painter. Under the title “Primary Structures: 1966/2006,” this thoughtful, concentrated show places works from the beginning of Knoebel’s career alongside a group of very recent pieces, including two panel paintings and a

  • Richard Deacon, Out of Order, 2003, steamed oak, stainless steel, and screws, 6' 3“ x 23' x 18' 8 1/2”.

    Richard Deacon

    Richard Deacon’s exuberant curiosity has led him to explore the fullest range of techniques and materials: He has, for example, made his own bricks, constructed a display table, and a made a work based on a collection of newspapers.

    Richard Deacon’s exuberant curiosity has led him to explore the fullest range of techniques and materials: He has, for example, made his own bricks, constructed a display table, and a made a work based on a collection of newspapers. Through his disarming openness he has continued for more than twenty-five years to conduct a complex debate with sculptural traditions and practices, as well as with the mechanisms through which a work offers itself for scrutiny. Some of the pieces in this exhibition—curated by Jonathan Watkins—demand to be literally walked on, looked down

  • Manfred Pernice, Untitled (Blue Square, 2 Holes), 1997, cut-and-pasted printed and painted paper with watercolor, pencil, and ballpoint pen on cardstock, 8 1/4 x 11 1/2".

    Manfred Pernice

    Manfred Pernice’s jerry-built structures and objects, along with the related imagery and documentation pasted to their surfaces or placed on adjacent gallery walls, address the ideological inflections and physical constrictions of architectural form.

    Manfred Pernice’s jerry-built structures and objects, along with the related imagery and documentation pasted to their surfaces or placed on adjacent gallery walls, address the ideological inflections and physical constrictions of architectural form. Scale is used as a wrench to open the mechanisms of manufacture and social control to inquiry: A tin can, for example, exchanges meaning and function with a dustbin or a skyscraper, and the conversation between them points up the constructed and manipulated nature of social space and the disjunctions that exist between

  • Declan Clarke

    In a series of short films made over the past few years, Declan Clarke has cast a humorous and critical eye on the ways in which the history of ideas can be discerned in present-day social structures and interpersonal relationships. These works have hitherto frequently concerned themselves with major characters from British history, such as Wellington, Nelson, and Byron. The London-based artist’s Dublin roots invariably reveal themselves in juxtaposition to the Britishness of his subject matter, lending mordancy to his combinations of word and image. For his most recent work, Mine Are of Trouble

  • Callum Innes

    This show, in the Scottish artist’s home city, will include twenty-four paintings from 1990 to the present and will be accompanied by a catalogue providing a substantial survey of his career to date.

    Callum Innes’s tender and absorbing paintings of the early ’90s startled with their bold interplay of painted areas and those washed clean with turpentine. The notionally precise geometries of these works are unsettled by chance in a process for which each act of expunging is also a further gesture of addition. In subsequent series, Innes has explored a wealth of similar subtleties and variations within this basic practice. More recently, he has also used shellac as a resistant surface on which paint can be moved around prior to drying. This show, in the Scottish artist’s

  • Keith Tyson

    Keith Tyson’s latest project comprises more than two hundred discrete sculptural forms—from illusionistic structures to residues of physical processes—that will be set out on a grid covering the floor and walls of the museum.

    Keith Tyson’s sense of wonder at individuality in a universe where everything is interdependent has given rise to a series of vibrant and complex works. His latest project comprises more than two hundred discrete sculptural forms—from illusionistic structures to residues of physical processes—that will be set out on a grid covering the floor and walls of the museum. Just as the radio telescopes in New Mexico’s Very Large Array combine to focus on a single point in the cosmos, Tyson’s Large Field Array, 2006, provides a “lens” through which the viewer

  • Bruce Nauman

    The largest Bruce Nauman exhibition in Europe since 1998, this survey follows the American artist’s understated yet commanding occupation of Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall last year and takes as its focus the artist’s ongoing investigations into the human condition. Comprehensive in scope, the show includes sixty works from the ’60s to the present, divided into two sections. The first concentrates on neon works, sound and instructional pieces, films and videos, works on paper, and sculptures that incorporate language, wordplay, and the use of Nauman’s own body. The second

  • Barry Flanagan

    From the soft sculptures of the late ’60s and the stone, marble, and sheet-metal pieces of the ’70s (with their allusions to Alfred Jarry’s absurdist ’pataphysics) to his more recent bronze casts of hares and other animals, British artist Barry Flanagan has always balanced humor and thoughtfulness with a concern for the essential qualities of sculpture—gravity, the manipulation of material, and representation. This career-spanning survey will extend out of doors onto IMMA’s grounds and even on to one of Dublin’s main thoroughfares, O’Connell Street, where Dublin City

  • Stephan Balkenhol

    In the ’70s, Stephan Balkenhol overlaid the question of figuration and the body with a spare, Conceptualist aesthetic, which has since resulted in an oeuvre both wry and serious. Eschewing the expressionist tone seen elsewhere in German art, such as that of Georg Baselitz, Balkenhol’s provocative disjunctions between the scale of figure and plinth consistently belie the ostensible narrative ordinariness of his men and women. This retrospective features some forty of the artist’s sculptures from the late ’70s to the present, together with about one hundred photographs

  • Ged Quinn

    Ged Quinn’s show at Tate St. Ives last year was called “Utopia Dystopia.” This one was “The Heavenly Machine,” a tag that likewise carries the infernal and the divine in equal measure. Quinn’s work contributes, along with that of artists like J. P. Munro and Nigel Cooke, to the current reimagining of history painting’s contemporary viability. He shares a sense of perplexity with Munro, though his paint handling and figuration are much more precise; and his disturbing mixture of visual elements and references is akin to Cooke’s compositional range, though Quinn’s are more overtly humorous.

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