Nana Last

  • NEW WAVE: FLUID ARCHITECTURE

    IN 2010, Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, cofounders of SANAA, completed one of their most ambitious projects to date: the Rolex Learning Center on the Lausanne, Switzerland, campus of the École Polytechnique Fédérale. Housing a complex mix of experimental research and educational facilities, the center comprises a single undulating story of over two hundred thousand square feet, expanding effortlessly across the site and appearing less a building than an animated field declaring a new direction in architecture. That same year, Sejima and Nishizawa were recognized with their

  • THE BEST BOOKS OF 2011

    Ten scholars, critics, writers, and artists choose the year’s outstanding titles.

    SVETLANA ALPERS

    Imagine that you are listening to a spirited conversation between a French art historian and a German painter. De Rouget and Daimler, as they are called, are at lunch on a recent October Sunday near Pontarlier. It is where Degas vacationed briefly in 1904 and where absinthe is made. In Il était plus grand que nous ne pensions: Édouard Manet et Degas (Paris: Nouvelles Éditions Scala/Collection Ateliers Imaginaires), Éric Darragon, author of a subtle biography of Manet and writings on contemporary German

  • Tomás Saraceno

    Imprinting the organic onto the built environment, Tomás Saraceno worked with arachnologists and astrophysicists for several years to make Galaxies Forming Along Filaments, like Droplets Along the Strands of a Spider’s Web, the awe-inducing room-size installation first presented at the 2009 Venice Biennale.

    Imprinting the organic onto the built environment, Tomás Saraceno worked with arachnologists and astrophysicists for several years to make Galaxies Forming Along Filaments, like Droplets Along the Strands of a Spider’s Web, the awe-inducing room-size installation first presented at the 2009 Venice Biennale. His inquiry into the correlating geometric structures of spiderwebs and the universe, interweaving ideas of scale and habitation, will evolve at Bonniers, where Saraceno installs a new iteration of the work—a complex, crowd-engulfing network of black elastic cords

  • Jorge Pardo

    Blurring the lines of craftsmanship and artmaking is intrinsic to Jorge Pardo’s practice: Since the early 1990s, the Cuban-born, Los Angeles–based artist has made a career of boundary-spanning work that erodes distinctions between art, architecture, and design by incorporating one practice into another.

    Blurring the lines of craftsmanship and artmaking is intrinsic to Jorge Pardo’s practice: Since the early 1990s, the Cuban-born, Los Angeles–based artist has made a career of boundary-spanning work that erodes distinctions between art, architecture, and design by incorporating one practice into another. For his first European museum solo, Pardo will again take up the roles of artist, designer, and something in between by way of some eighty works produced over the past fifteen years—everything from lighting and furniture to found objects, sculptures, works on paper, and,

  • “Psycho Buildings: Artists and Architecture”

    At times crossing disciplinary boundaries, at other times reinventing them, “Psycho Buildings” insists that architecture be understood as an elastic construct.

    Through its navigation of a wide range of physical, psychological, aesthetic, and sociopolitical territories, this show makes clear that exhibitions of art as architecture (or architecture as art?) have not exhausted their subject but expanded it. At times crossing disciplinary boundaries, at other times reinventing them, “Psycho Buildings,” organized by Ralph Rugoff, insists that architecture be understood as an elastic construct. The exhibition, which takes its title from a 1988 book of photographs by Martin Kippenberger, consists of major installations from Atelier

  • “Peripheral Vision and Collective Body”

    The inaugural exhibition at the Museion's new building centers on the relationship between architecture and performance.

    The inaugural exhibition at the Museion's new building (designed by Berlin-based architects KSV Krüger Schubert Vandreike) centers on the relationship between architecture and performance. With approximately four hundred artworks and documentation in various media, the show promises to intertwine architecture, art, the body, dance, and history, echoing the fluidity of the museum's own interior spaces. A focus on our “collective body” is deployed as a critical strategy to investigate how contemporary work has been informed by postwar American avant-gardes, as well as