Nato Thompson

  • interviews W.A.G.E.

    IT’S A CURIOUS TWIST in the history of art that de-skilling—the reduction of the once-hallowed making of art to the level of performing the mundane task of the day—has cut both ways. When Seurat famously said he just wanted to be paid by the hour, he was cannily acknowledging the routinization and commodification of all forms of experience in the advent of modernity, and at the same time attempting to defy bourgeois notions of artistic virtuosity and to undermine the traditional value of art itself. But three-quarters of a century later, amid the birth of institutional critique and

  • “Forms of Resistance”

    Taking the 1871 Paris Commune, the Russian Revolution, May ’68, and the post-9/11 era as its points of historical comparison, “Forms of Resistance: Artists and the Desire for Social Change from 1871 to the Present” examines the evolving relationship between art and politics.

    Taking the 1871 Paris Commune, the Russian Revolution, May ’68, and the post-9/11 era as its points of historical comparison, “Forms of Resistance: Artists and the Desire for Social Change from 1871 to the Present” examines the evolving relationship between art and politics. Curators Will Bradley, Charles Esche, and Phillip van den Bossche, all of whom have a long-standing interest in the interrogation of social practice and its presentation, bring together such canonical artists as Édouard Manet, André Breton, and Barbara Kruger