Nicholas Cullinan

  • 1000 WORDS: HENRIK OLESEN

    IMAGINE A PECULIAR, ERSATZ VERSION of the censoriously right-wing British newspaper the Daily Mail: Alongside pedestrian stories on pension funds and gossip items about Jude Law, one finds conspicuously incongruous features on Édouard Manet’s lesbian muse and cross-dressing in colonial America. In fact, Berlin-based artist Henrik Olesen has shown us just what such a cheek-by-jowl pastiche would look like. Called Manipulating Media, 2002, the work also defaced headlines with agitprop statistics such as “The USA currently imprisons two million of its citizens,” lifted from sources including Noam

  • the 2nd Turin Triennial

    LESS A THEME AND MORE A MOOD, the saturnine was the tragic muse of the second installment of the Turin Triennial, curated by Daniel Birnbaum. Subtitled “50 Moons of Saturn”—one for each artist included—and spread across three sites, this triennial was symptomatic of a spate of recent exhibitions that seem to have developed feelings in place of concepts. Last year’s group exhibition at Stockholm’s Moderna Museet, “Eclipse: Art in a Dark Age,” and Massimiliano Gioni’s “After Nature” at the New Museum in New York were similarly despondent and dejected, while at the other end of the emotional

  • Pablo Bronstein

    Pablo Bronstein is the latest artist to take on the challenge provided by Galleria Franco Noero’s new space in the Casa Scaccabarozzi, a quirky building designed by the nineteenth-century architect Alessandro Antonelli and known locally as the “slice of polenta” because of its extremely narrow triangular shape. Titling his exhibition “Palazzi Torinesi” (Palaces of Turin), Bronstein immersed himself in this princely milieu to revisit and reimagine some of the city’s landmark buildings in works in a range of media, from painting to video, spread over six floors.

    Gone were the capriccios grafting

  • Andy Warhol, Brigitte Bardot (detail), 1974, diptych, acrylic and silkscreen on linen, each 47 3⁄4 x 47 3⁄4". © 2009 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

    “Warhol’s Wide World”

    Andy Warhol’s entire operation—much like the diptych portraits to be included in this exhibition—was always a Janus-faced endeavor.

    Andy Warhol’s entire operation—much like the diptych portraits to be included in this exhibition—was always a Janus-faced endeavor. Both the depth and face value of his work relied on binaries—before and after, ugly and beautiful—and the tension that ricocheted between the two. This survey will examine Warhol’s dalliances in the outmoded genre of commissioned portraiture, particularly during the 1970s and ’80s, when the aspirational Andy flattered the faces of the rich and famous, from Fiat mogul Gianni Agnelli to Brigitte Bardot. Recent attempts to