Nuit Banai

  • Eran Shakine

    Forty-two years after the publication of Robert Morris’s Notes on Sculpture in these pages, the reception of Minimalism and post-Minimalism remains a live issue, so it is not altogether surprising to witness the reappearance of these idioms as mediated through motifs of Judaism. While Morris probably did not envisage the permutation of his “unitary forms” into anything like Eran Shakine’s sagging, handcrafted, toxic-hued Orange Menorah (all works 2008), such an extension into a culturally and religiously specific context may be an inevitable outcome of their engagement with the phenomenological

  • “Real Time: Art in Israel 1998–2008”

    With the state of Israel celebrating its sixtieth anniversary, six museums across the country mounted exhibitions that tried to capture the artistic essence of each decade since the nation’s founding. Considering Jerusalem’s historical and sociopolitical symbolism, it is probably no accident that the Israel Museum hosted the contemporary chapter of this dispersed survey, “Real Time: Art in Israel 1998–2008.” Seeming to represent an overwhelming consensus, the critical operations of the forty selected artists, most born in the years between the Six-Day War (1967) and the Yom Kippur War (1973),

  • “Expo 58”

    With all the fanfare surrounding the fortieth anniversary of May 1968, one should not overlook the period that led to its events. The year 1958 was rife with unresolved sociopolitical tensions that would pave the way for the protests to come. In this context, the homage to the 1958 Exposition Universelle in Brussels, held at the fair’s fantastic space-age centerpiece, the Atomium, was illuminating. Featuring publicity materials, newspaper clippings, tourist ephemera, vintage photographs, and documentary films from the period, this retrospective, “Expo 58: Between Utopia and Reality,” curated by

  • Talia Keinan

    As the winner of the 2007 Nathan Gottesdiener Foundation prize, the most prestigious accolade given to an Israeli artist under forty, Talia Keinan has finally come into her own. After a few years of uneven explorations in video, installation, and drawing, she delivered an offering whose starts and stutters are an integral part of the work. Key to this coming of age is a motto Keinan has inscribed on her drawing book: “I had union with my closed hand, I embraced my shadow as a wife.” Taken from the Egyptian myth of creation, this cryptic sentence points to Keinan’s deepening insight about her

  • Tsibi Geva, Untitled, 2006, mixed media on canvas, 78 3/4 x 78 3/4".

    Tsibi Geva

    Since the early 1980s, Tsibi Geva has been interrogating the paradox-riven myths and national symbols that construct Israeli identity in an aesthetic language whose fidelity to abstraction is persistently problematized.

    Since the early 1980s, Tsibi Geva has been interrogating the paradox-riven myths and national symbols that construct Israeli identity in an aesthetic language whose fidelity to abstraction is persistently problematized. Ready-made materials permeate the artist’s paintings, which sometimes expand beyond their ironic, gestural expressivity to become site-specific installations. This midcareer retrospective spanning the past twenty years will showcase some fifty works from Geva’s most significant series—“Keffiyeh,” “Terrazzo,” “Grids,” “Windows,” “Birds,” “Thorns,” and “