Patrick Rumble

  • Paolo Gioli, L’operatore perforato (The Perforated Cameraman), 1979, 16 mm, black-and-white, silent, 8 minutes 53 seconds at 18 fps.

    PERSISTENCE OF VISION: THE FILMS OF PAOLO GIOLI

    After the history of the rectangle in film, we’ll have
    to write a history of the meaning of darkness in
    the cinema.
    —Paolo Gioli

    IN HIS DE ANIMA, Aristotle identifies the human being as a blinking animal—at once capable of vision but also, and more importantly, able to close his eyes, to choose not to see, and therefore able to reflect. “[Human eyes have a certain superiority] over those of hard-eyed animals,” the philosopher observed. “Man’s eyes have in the eyelids a kind of shelter or envelope, which must be shifted or drawn back in order that we may see, while hard-eyed animals have



  • Still from Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Decameron, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 111 minutes.

    A CINEMA OF POETRY: THE FILMS OF PIER PAOLO PASOLINI

    PIER PAOLO PASOLINI first visited New York City in late 1966, and what he found there surprised him: In the heated context of the antiwar movement and the struggle for civil rights—which he characterized forcefully as a “civil war”—the forty-four-year-old Italian poet and filmmaker rediscovered a spirit of political and cultural renewal that he had experienced only once before, during the last months of World War II, when the Italian partisans rose up against Nazism and Fascism in what was itself largely an internecine conflict—one that had claimed his brother’s life.

    In America,

  • Pier Paolo Pasolini, Salò, o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom), 1975, 35 mm, color, sound, 114 minutes. Photo: Criterion Collection.
    film December 13, 2012

    A Cinema of Poetry

    PIER PAOLO PASOLINI first visited New York City in late 1966, and what he found there surprised him: In the heated context of the antiwar movement and the struggle for civil rights—which he characterized forcefully as a “civil war”—the forty-four-year-old Italian poet and filmmaker rediscovered a spirit of political and cultural renewal that he had experienced only once before, during the last months of World War II, when the Italian partisans rose up against Nazism and Fascism in what was itself largely an internecine conflict—one that had claimed his brother’s life.

    In America,

  • Pier Paolo Pasolini

    Pasolini was twentieth-century Italy’s most important and provocative cultural figure. A writer, filmmaker, playwright, and painter, he focused his oeuvre on sexuality, politics, religion, and revolution. One of Italy’s first no-globals, he was also among its last romantic visionaries. Murdered in 1975, Pasolini’s last years were spent denouncing political corruption and making aesthetically astonishing work, such as the infamous film Salò (1975), which attacked transnational consumer capitalism. The thirtieth anniversary of his assassination (which