Rachel Greene

  • Open Books

    In some ways the Net remains like a seedy nightclub: The fuzz rarely knows what’s really happening, even if they bust in occasionally. Subversive projects flourish in the shadows of more respectable activities, and despite Napster’s public evisceration, kids, opportunists, and indie types enjoy a new class of open-source browsers, peer-to-peer tools, code libraries, and uncontrollable flows of cultural data (music, movies, porn, writing). Out of this wellspring comes textz.com.

    A free archive of radical writing or “backup system for scientific and artistic purposes,” textz.com, created by German

  • Open Books

    In some ways the Net remains like a seedy nightclub: The fuzz rarely knows what’s really happening, even if they bust in occasionally. Subversive projects flourish in the shadows of more respectable activities, and despite Napster’s public evisceration, kids, opportunists, and indie types enjoy a new class of open-source browsers, peerto-peer tools, code libraries, and uncontrollable flows of cultural data (music, movies, porn, writing). Out of this wellspring comes textz.com.

    A free archive of radical writing or “backup system for scientific and artistic purposes,” textz.com, created by German

  • Le Tigre

    FAMILIAR WITH HERM CHOREOGRAPHY? Well, if you’ve ever attended a Le Tigre concert, choreographed by band member JD Samson, you’ve seen it. Herm (slang for androgynous queer) locates Samson and the boy-band-derivative moves one sees at Le Tigre shows—her tributes to how queer bodies negotiate the world. Equal parts dance style and critical intervention, Samson’s choreography is just one element of a performance practice that reopens questions about community, fandom, feminism, queerness, and their conjunctions and differences, by drawing on staged spectacle, audience exuberance, and punk-derived

  • Rachel Greene

    RACHEL GREENE

    1. Neu! The perfect sound track to Richter’s “18. Oktober 1977” cycle. With its mesmerizing oppositional and aimless tracks, this rerelease, from the same fraught world (’70s West Germany) as Baader-Meinhof, encapsulates that culture’s urge to self-define.

    2. P.J. Harvey, Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea No longer a singing interface to some archetype of a suffering, rejected woman, P.J.’s energy has become less labile, more Patti Smith.

    3. The Strokes, Is This It Like Vanessa Beecroft’s bored mannequins, the Strokes ooze ennui. I’d imagined them as normal kids who’d

  • WEB WORK: A HISTORY OF INTERNET ART

    The term “net.art” is less a coinage than an accident, the result of a software glitch that occurred in December 1995, when Slovenian artist Vuk Cosic opened an anonymous e-mail only to find it had been mangled in transmission. Amid a morass of alphanumeric gibberish, Cosic could make out just one legible term—“net.art”—which he began using to talk about online art and communications. Spreading like a virus among certain interconnected Internet communities, the term was quickly enlisted to describe a variety of everyday activities. Net.art stood for communications and graphics, e-mail, texts

  • Alien Intelligence

    In 1982, Steven Spielberg brought us alien intelligence in an appealing shell. Cute, and family-values friendly, E.T. made movie audiences feel human. Now, some two decades later, Kiasma puts on a show with alien intelligence (read: computers) as the star. But curator Erkki Huhtamo is all too aware that Turing’s offspring aren’t as cuddly as Hollywood extraterrestrials, and he pulls no punches when it comes to the dark side of artificial intellection. Artists like Zoe Beloff, Perry Hoberman, and Christoph Hildebrand contribute various iterations of conceptual techno-art—some of them pointedly