Rachel Haidu

  • Amy Sillman

    By titling her new exhibition “Landline,” Amy Sillman might seem to suggest a longing for the past. But no one would accuse the artist of nostalgia. The show—organized by Martin Clark and containing thirteen paintings, several groups of works on paper, and two animated videos—is set firmly in the present, and makes it clear that our politics are ruling, invading, colonizing Sillman’s mood.

    The show’s first room features Dub Stamp, 2018, a suite of twelve double-sided works on paper hung on a wire cutting diagonally across Camden Arts Centre’s large, street-facing second-floor space.

  • Edward Krasiński

    Since his remarkable Warsaw studio was reopened as a permanent exhibition soon after his death in 2004, Edward Krasiński has become an increasingly visible avatar of Polish Conceptual art. How does art challenge its own commodification even under state socialism? Tate Liverpool’s forthcoming retrospective—the first ever in the UK—will provide a range of answers from the artist’s entire production, beginning with the rarely seen suspended sculptures of 1964–65. Delicate visual puns, these works accentuate the latent surrealism that winds

  • “Marcel Broodthaers: Retrospective”

    Those who thought they knew this father of institutional critique will have their heads turned by Marcel Broodthaers’s first US survey in a quarter century. Comprising some 200 works, including early egg- and mussel-shell pieces, film installations that incorporate the works’ packaging and screens, and the late décors—which combined retrospective, film set, and proto-installation art—MoMA’s exhibition builds on its acquisition of the extraordinary Daled collection and is complemented by a catalogue with essays from the curators,

  • “Dance/Draw”

    DANCE AND DRAWING each pose unique challenges for curators. If drawing can be difficult to exhibit, that is because of its relation to reading and to the page—it can be unspectacular in the extreme. Dance, on the other hand, can be played up as participatory spectacle (as it was in last year’s disappointing “Move: Choreographing You” at London’s Hayward Gallery) or shown as video, robbing spectators of its most essential elements—actual bodies in space. To the great credit of curator Helen Molesworth, “Dance/Draw” skirted these problems. The show elucidated the relationship between

  • Sven Augustijnen’s Spectres

    THERE IS A MOMENT about twenty-five minutes into Sven Augustijnen’s film Spectres, 2011, that goes straight to the heart of how politics, history, and empire intersect in Belgium. Historian (and Chevalier) Jacques Brassinne de la Buissière is driving away from the gray stone mansion of Count Arnould d’Aspremont Lynden, whose late father was Belgium’s minister of African Affairs at the time of Congo’s liberation. The count has just granted Brassinne a friendly interview, complete with glasses of beer on the veranda, regarding the role of the minister and by extension the Belgian government in

  • Luis Camnitzer

    PROGRESSIVE INSTITUTIONS such as New York’s Museo del Barrio can epitomize the crisis of confidence in contemporary art. Their programming, often extremely well conceived and executed, tends to delineate such a radically democratizing role for art and its institutions that the art on display can sometimes appear merely illustrative or even redundant. Such a threat hangs over the Museo’s current retrospective of the work of Luis Camnitzer, which is simultaneously excellent and frustrating. If the complexity of Camnitzer’s work guards against art’s instrumentalization (by radical politics or any

  • “New Realisms”

    THE TITLE OF THIS EXTRAORDINARY EXHIBITION at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía—“New Realisms: 1957–1962”—is one of its several provocative maneuvers. The French movement known as Nouveau Réalisme first came to New York City—thanks in no small part to Pierre Restany’s egomaniacal, chauvinistic rhetoric and superlative networking abilities—with William Seitz’s “The Art of Assemblage” at the Museum of Modern Art in 1961 and Sidney Janis’s gallery show “The New Realists” the following year. If the former dug into history (Mallarmé, Apollinaire, Picasso) in order to legitimate the complete

  • Marcel Broodthaers

    Fifty years ago, Brussels’s Royal Museums of Fine Arts entered a protracted debate over where to put their modern art, partly inspiring Marcel Broodthaers’s foundational work of institutional critique Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles, 1968...

    Fifty years ago, Brussels’s Royal Museums of Fine Arts entered a protracted debate over where to put their modern art, partly inspiring Marcel Broodthaers’s foundational work of institutional critique Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles, 1968. The Royal Museums’ solution? To carve out an eight-story basement, the bottom floor of which now holds a phenomenal collection of works by the hometown star. This summer, some sixty-five pieces will be unearthed, including (alongside iconic “Pop” works in mussel and eggshells) the never-before-exhibited ink-on-metal “draft”

  • Wolf Vostell

    Wolf Vostell was not only a pioneer of video art and “dé-coll/age” but also the founder of the first museum of Fluxus. This latter project, an unlikely détente between video and happenings and their institutionalization, could be Vostell's ultimate medium.

    Wolf Vostell was not only a pioneer of video art and “dé-coll/age” but also the founder of the first museum of Fluxus. This latter project, an unlikely détente between video and happenings and their institutionalization, could be Vostell's ultimate medium. The first lines of his Itzehoe manifesto (1965) offer a more humorous glimpse of his sensibility: “Read this manifesto / And decollage it, / While you wash it / And dry it.” This retrospective (which builds on an exhibition at the Rheinisches LandesMuseum in Bonn last year) brings together some fifty works in many, and

  • Edward Krasinski’s Studio

    WHEN POLISH ARTIST Edward Krasinski died in 2004 at the age of seventy-nine, his practice was only beginning to receive the international acclaim it deserves within the canon of postwar Conceptual art. Next month this legacy receives further confirmation when his apartment and work-studio, now maintained by the Foksal Gallery Foundation, opens to the public. Located in a Communist-era apartment block at Aleja Solidarnozsci 64 (64 Solidarity Avenue) in downtown Warsaw, the radically reinvented space showcases Krasinski’s steady wit and wry subtlety, even as it is now suffused with a sense of

  • SET PIECE: DÉCOR—A CONQUEST BY MARCEL BROODTHAERS

    THE SHOOTING OF MARCEL BROODTHAERS’S FILM La Bataille de Waterloo, at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts in June 1975, was timed to coincide with the British military pageant known as Trooping the Colour. The spectacle is staged annually on the Mall, and as the infantry and cavalry perform elaborate drills in full dress, a mood of orderly festivity prevails, betraying little of the ceremony’s origins in the psychic exigencies of war. Trooping the Colour re-creates an old battlefield ritual in which flags representing the regiment and the sovereign were paraded through the ranks before