Rainer Crone

  • Subjectivity in Time: Kasimir Malevich

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    The concept of “nonobjectivity,” the word Kasimir Malevich used to discuss his paintings and the ideas surrounding his

    Suprematist art, involves a departure, a detachment, from previous modes of painting and representation. It also implies a

    new understanding of humanity's (and the artist's) situation in the world. In order to assign meaning to his work, Malevich

    felt, he had to define nonobjectivity in familiar terms. The advent of the new is valid only when its opposition to the old

    is understood. Thus it is informative to examine the artistic and intellectual context from which Malevich

  • SUBJECTIVITY IN TIME: KASMIR MALEVICH

    In Cézanne’s landscape we find very few illusory elements: this means that Cézanne’s landscape is concerned least of all with introducing us to the experiences of reality. It leaves us in our own existence without transferring my “I” to another moment in time, making it experience the reality of the picture at the given moment.

    —Kasimir Malevich, “An Analysis of New and Imitative Art (Paul Cézanne)”

    THE CONCEPT OF “NONOBJECTIVITY,” the word Kasimir Malevich used to discuss his paintings and the ideas surrounding his Suprematist art, involves a departure, a detachment, from previous modes of

  • JIRI GEORG DOKOUPIL: THE IMPRISONED BRAIN

    It might be that we are all painted savages since Sophocles. But there is more to Art than the straightness of lines and the perfection of surfaces. Plasticity of style is not as large as the entire idea. . . . We have too many things and not enough forms.

    —Gustave Flaubert, Préface à la vie d’écrivain

    THE BLAUE REITER ALMANAC of 1912 was of momentous importance for German art. As Franz Marc, one of the two publishers (the other being Wassily Kandinsky), wrote at the time, the idea of style in art suffered a drastic collapse in the mid-19th century. This observation is of topical interest today,

  • Malevich and Khlebnikov: Suprematism Reinterpreted

    To man’s actual existence there belongs a surrounding world, just as the statues of a god have a temple. This is the reason why we must mention the manifold threads which link the ideal (or the beauty of art) to externality and are drawn through it. . . .

    —G.F. Hegel, Lectures on Fine Art

    IN JUNE 1915, FOR THE occasion of the last Futurist exhibition in St. Petersburg, Kasimir Malevich published a treatise entitled From Cubism and Futurism to Suprematism: The New Pictorial Realism, which asserted that “. . . all painting past and present before Suprematism was reduced to servitude to the forms