Reena Jana

  • Anish Kapoor

    Anish Kapoor's sculptures draw on broad references: nineteenth-century Indian architecture, Turner sunsets, Minimalism, viscera. It has been fifteen years since his last US museum survey, and the ICA's flexible, high-ceilinged galleries promise the right fit for his increasingly monumental work.

    Anish Kapoor's sculptures draw on broad references: nineteenth-century Indian architecture, Turner sunsets, Minimalism, viscera. It has been fifteen years since his last US museum survey, and the ICA's flexible, high-ceilinged galleries promise the right fit for his increasingly monumental work. The venue will be stripped of its interior walls, in order to accommodate thirteen of Kapoor's large works, dating from 1979 to 2007, most making their US debut. The exhibition will feature Kapoor's signature pieces in pigment, mirror, and wax, including two selections from his

  • Past in Reverse: Contemporary Art of East Asia

    After a nearly decadelong succession of regionally themed surveys of contemporary Asian art, “Past in Reverse” explores how twenty-one artists and collectives reinterpret indigenous forms such as scroll paintings. The show not only presents the usual suspects (Cai Guo-Qiang, Wang Qingsong) but also takes a risk with a long roster of unknowns.

    The regionally themed survey of contemporary Asian art, met with generic “East meets West” curatorial rhetoric, can seem as outdated as fusion cuisine. After a nearly decadelong succession of such offerings, “Past in Reverse” explores how twenty-one artists and collectives reinterpret indigenous forms such as scroll paintings. The show not only presents the usual suspects (Cai Guo-Qiang, Wang Qingsong) but also takes a risk with a long roster of unknowns, suggesting that while East Asia now has claim to a bevy of internationally established artists, it remains a hotbed of experimentation.

  • Edge of Desire: Recent Art in India

    This show of more than eighty works by thirty-two artists and collectives hopes to do for contemporary Indian art what “Inside Out: New Chinese Art” did in 1998 for art from China.

    This show of more than eighty works by thirty-two artists and collectives hopes to do for contemporary Indian art what “Inside Out: New Chinese Art” did in 1998 for art from China. That is, to provide both regional and global contexts that challenge preconceptions of recent art from India—whose presence in Western pop culture is often limited to Bollywood, yoga, and outsourcing. The show presents work by urban, nondiasporic artists like documentary photographer Dayanita Singh yet also takes a curatorial risk by offering pieces by rural folk artists such as painter Swarna Chitrakar, who reinterprets

  • Manual Labor

    EXHIBITIONS OF NEW MEDIA tend to focus on the new; as a result, artists working with computers in the ’80s who set precedents for today’s technologically savvy photographers, video artists, and Net artists often get overlooked. Take Ed Hill and Suzanne Bloom, aka Manual: The duo has been experimenting with digital manipulation since 1985, eleven years after they pioneered montage and text techniques that eerily presage many a Photoshop construction or Flash animation, yet Manual is rarely referenced in articles or shows of new-media art. This summer, Hill and Bloom—who contributed to Artforum

  • news October 11, 2001

    SWISS INSTITUTE WANTS TO PLAY

    SWISS INSTITUTE WANTS TO PLAY

    “The Swiss Institute is in no way a showcase of Swiss culture,” says Marc-Olivier Wahler, when I ask him what’s Swiss about the New York exhibition space and arts organization. In response, the affable young curator hired last October to reinvigorate the institute’s program gives me a quizzical look, as if my question were incomprehensible. “If it were so, it would be boring, and I wouldn’t be here.”

    For Wahler, Switzerland is as much a metaphor as an actual country. “Switzerland is not a nation. It’s an attitude of self-effacement, of stealth,” he insists. “It’s invisible, but once you see it,

  • news September 06, 2001

    US NEWS ROUNDUP

    US NEWS ROUNDUP

    THE ARMORY SHOW 2002 BEGINS TO TAKE SHAPE: Last year’s Armory Show seemed to suffer from growing pains. As attendance doubled to 20,000 from the previous year, many visitors and participants complained about a lack of organization at the two-venue structure. So how will the 2002 edition, scheduled for February 21-25 at the same location, piers 88 and 90 in Manhattan, and headed by a new managing director, former investment banker Timothy H. Smith, compare? When the deadline for applications arrived on August 31, over 600 galleries had contacted the organizers, seeking one of only 150 slots—twenty

  • news September 04, 2001

    A DEITCH GROWS IN BROOKLYN

    A DEITCH GROWS IN BROOKLYN

    Imagine the following: a raw, unfinished new gallery space in Williamsburg that’s open evenings and Sundays but closed on Saturdays; inside, hard-to-sell art such as a Web-based installation by the British Net-art collective Fakeshop; on some evenings, musical events; and, last but not least, a weekly Webcast talk show. Sounds like an upstart artist-run, grant-funded nonprofit space, right? Or perhaps a boutique run by a bookish, Deleuzian critic turned dealer? An elaborate conceptual artwork produced by a European artist?

    None of these, it turns out, describe the new 4000-square-foot gallery

  • David A. Ross

    AS ABRUPTLY AS THE DEATH of a Silicon Valley dot-com, David A. Ross’s flashy three-year stint as director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art came to an end on August 16, when he unexpectedly resigned. The departure was so sudden that even Ross’s wife, speaking to the San Francisco Chronicle, called her husband’s decision “a surprise.”

    “I’ve worked in art museums without interruption for nearly thirty-two years. The prospect of some time to think is, quite frankly, a dream come true,” Ross explained when asked why he interrupted his largely successful run at SF MoMA—during which museum

  • news August 31, 2001

    YOKOHAMA TRIENNALE OPENS THIS WEEKEND

    YOKOHAMA TRIENNALE OPENS THIS WEEKEND

    Billed as “the first large-scale international exhibition to be held in Japan,” the Yokohama Triennale, titled “Mega-Wave,” seems to find itself in the same paradoxical position so many international art shows now find themselves in: The more it tries to establish itself as a must-visit destination, the less you thrill at the prospect of spending fifteen or eighteen hours in flight to get there. Its shiny list of well-recognized artists and curators, carefully designed to generate interest and critical attention, makes it feel, in fact, too much like other large international festivals.

    Like last

  • news August 21, 2001

    DAVID A. ROSS RESIGNS FROM SF MoMA

    DAVID A. ROSS RESIGNS FROM SF MoMA

    David A. Ross abruptly resigned as director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (www.sfmoma.org) last Friday, a position he had accepted after leaving the Whitney Museum of American Art three years ago. The move came so unexpectedly that the San Francisco Chronicle, in an article published on Friday, quoted several people prominent in the San Francisco art community expressing their disbelief. The story even quoted Ross’s wife saying that the move was “a surprise."

    In an attempt to explain their director’s unexpected departure, the museum’s board of trustees issued a statement saying that

  • news August 17, 2001

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    DENVER ART MUSEUM HIRES NEW-MEDIA AND PHOTO CURATOR: After a year-long search, John Pultz has been named a consulting curator of photography and new media for the Denver Art Museum's modern and contemporary art department (www.denverartmuseum.org). In addition to planning the display of the museum's collection of photography in its new contemporary art wing, which will open in 2005, Pultz will organize photography, video, and digital-art exhibitions, and intends to continue his current duties as associate professor of art history and curator of photography at the Spencer Museum of Art at the

  • news August 15, 2001

    MARK DION AND CLAIRE COREY HONORED BY ALDRICH MUSEUM

    MARK DION AND CLAIRE COREY HONORED BY ALDRICH MUSEUM

    Conceptual artist Mark Dion has been named the recipient of the 2001 Larry Aldrich Foundation Award. Selected by a panel that included, among others, curator Thelma Golden, artist Doug Aitken, gallerist Bill Maynes, writer and curator Dominique Nahas, and founding director of the New Museum, Marcia Tucker, Dion receives $25,000 and a show at the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art (www.aldrichart.org), which gives the award annually to an American artist whose work has been influential in the previous three years. Past recipients have included Elizabeth Murray, Cindy Sherman, Bruce Nauman, Robert

  • news August 13, 2001

    MOMA MAKES A MOVE

    MOMA MAKES A MOVE

    This week, New York’s Museum of Modern Art (www.moma.org) plans to demolish its north wing. It will be the latest step in the institution’s $650 million renovation. But as construction continues on Yoshio Taniguchi’s design for the new West 53rd Street building, MoMA has been equally preoccupied with moving its offices and galleries to a temporary home designed by architect Michael Maltzan in Long Island City, Queens. When it opens in the summer of 2002, the MoMA QNS, as it will be called, will offer 25,000 square feet of exhibition space (as compared to MoMA’s current 85,000 square feet).

    The

  • news August 08, 2001

    HASEGAWA CHOOSES ARTISTS FOR ISTANBUL BIENNIAL

    HASEGAWA CHOOSES ARTISTS FOR ISTANBUL BIENNIAL

    The list of artists participating in the 7th Istanbul Biennial (www.istfest.org/bienal/eng/bienalFrameset.htm) was confirmed this week. Among the group of sixty international artists are well-known figures such as Rirkrit Tiravanija, Gabriel Orozco, On Kawara, Isa Genzken, Sislej Xhafa, Chris Burden, and Guillermo Kuitca. But the list also extends to less obvious choices, including Japanese architectural firm SANAA, which designed the new Prada beauty shops, Chris Cunningham, the young British music-video director who shot the video for Björk?s ?All Is Full of Love,? and fashion designer Hussein

  • news August 02, 2001

    MAYA LIN; GLASS AND NESHAT; PERRY DEAN ROGERS & PARTNERS

    MAYA LIN; GLASS AND NESHAT; PERRY DEAN ROGERS & PARTNERS

    MAYA LIN TO DESIGN SCULPTURECENTER: Architect and sculptor Maya Lin was chosen last month to design the new facility of SculptureCenter, which is currently in the process of moving from Manhattan’s Upper East Side to Long Island City. “Lin really understands the architectural issues of exhibition and work spaces,” said Mary Ceruti, executive director of SculptureCenter. “She’s highly responsive to site, content, and material. That will serve us well given the nature of the existing building.” Other finalists in the competition were Deborah Berke, Diller + Scofidio, Specht Harpman Design, and

  • news August 01, 2001

    CAI GUO-QIANG WITHDRAWS WORK FROM PARRISH SHOW

    CAI GUO-QIANG WITHDRAWS WORK FROM PARRISH SHOW

    Chinese-born artist Cai Guo-Qiang refused to alter his proposal for a new installation set to debut last week in “About the Bayberry Bush,” an exhibition of work by twelve contemporary artists commissioned by the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, NY. Guest curators Ingrid Schaffner and Melissa Feldman asked the artists, who also include Peter Doig, Bonnie Collura, Lee Mingwei, Joan Jonas, and Joseph Grigely, to create works in response to a popular nineteenth-century painting entitled The Bayberry Bush, 1895, by American Impressionist William Merritt Chase. Cai proposed a room-size installation

  • news July 31, 2001

    POTENTIAL NEA CHIEF WINS FRIENDS AND FOES

    POTENTIAL NEA CHIEF WINS FRIENDS AND FOES

    Since National Endowment for the Arts chairman William Ivey announced earlier this year that he plans to step down from his post in September, the Bush administration has been searching for a replacement. A leading contender is Roy Goodman, a liberal Republican state senator in New York who worked for the NEA in George Bush Sr.’s administration. Leading cultural figures have been quick to declare their endorsement of Goodman. Philippe de Montebello, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the institution’s president, David E. McKinney, have cowritten a letter to the White House praising

  • news July 26, 2001

    SF MoMA MOUNTS SHOW OUTSIDE THE WHITE CUBE

    SF MoMA MOUNTS SHOW OUTSIDE THE WHITE CUBE

    Mounting an exhibition outside the confines of the white cube can be fraught with unpredictable challenges and dangers, as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (www.sfmoma.org) recently discovered in organizing “Revelatory Landscapes,” the institution’s first offsite outdoor exhibition. On view through October 14, the show features work by five landscape designers whose installations are hybrids of traditional landscape architecture and contemporary land art, with a nod to the Earth Art movement of the ’60s and ’70s. According to Leah Levy, an independent curator who co-organized the exhibition

  • news July 25, 2001

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    FRANK GEHRY REVEALS MODEL AND NEW INSPIRATION: After recently unveiling his design for the Ohr-O’Keeffe Museum of Art in Biloxi, MS, architect Frank Gehry announced that his future museum plans—including those for the Guggenheim branch in lower Manhattan—may be influenced by the more intimate structures he created for the Ohr-O’Keeffe. Gehry set the $16 million, 25,000-square-foot museum as a series of five smaller buildings (dedicated, respectively, to contemporary art, African-American art, the work of the nineteenth-century Mississippi ceramicist George Ohr, administrative offices, and

  • news July 24, 2001

    APEX ART SELECTS CURATORS AND HOSTS CONFERENCE IN BRAZIL

    APEX ART SELECTS CURATORS AND HOSTS CONFERENCE IN BRAZIL

    The Apex Art (www.apexart.org) curatorial program for the 2001-2002 season has recently been finalized. In September the seven-year-old nonprofit space known for its unconventional exhibitions will host an exhibition by Venezuelan-born independent curator Euridice Arratia about modern sports fandom. In October, Spanish writer and curator Montse Badia will present works that deal with the conflict between public and private space. In January, Kelly Taxter , a digital musician and former director of the DNA gallery in Provincetown, MA, will devote an exhibition to artists who modify everyday