Reena Jana

  • news August 13, 2001

    MOMA MAKES A MOVE

    MOMA MAKES A MOVE

    This week, New York’s Museum of Modern Art (www.moma.org) plans to demolish its north wing. It will be the latest step in the institution’s $650 million renovation. But as construction continues on Yoshio Taniguchi’s design for the new West 53rd Street building, MoMA has been equally preoccupied with moving its offices and galleries to a temporary home designed by architect Michael Maltzan in Long Island City, Queens. When it opens in the summer of 2002, the MoMA QNS, as it will be called, will offer 25,000 square feet of exhibition space (as compared to MoMA’s current 85,000 square feet).

    The

  • news August 08, 2001

    HASEGAWA CHOOSES ARTISTS FOR ISTANBUL BIENNIAL

    HASEGAWA CHOOSES ARTISTS FOR ISTANBUL BIENNIAL

    The list of artists participating in the 7th Istanbul Biennial (www.istfest.org/bienal/eng/bienalFrameset.htm) was confirmed this week. Among the group of sixty international artists are well-known figures such as Rirkrit Tiravanija, Gabriel Orozco, On Kawara, Isa Genzken, Sislej Xhafa, Chris Burden, and Guillermo Kuitca. But the list also extends to less obvious choices, including Japanese architectural firm SANAA, which designed the new Prada beauty shops, Chris Cunningham, the young British music-video director who shot the video for Björk?s ?All Is Full of Love,? and fashion designer Hussein

  • news August 02, 2001

    MAYA LIN; GLASS AND NESHAT; PERRY DEAN ROGERS & PARTNERS

    MAYA LIN; GLASS AND NESHAT; PERRY DEAN ROGERS & PARTNERS

    MAYA LIN TO DESIGN SCULPTURECENTER: Architect and sculptor Maya Lin was chosen last month to design the new facility of SculptureCenter, which is currently in the process of moving from Manhattan’s Upper East Side to Long Island City. “Lin really understands the architectural issues of exhibition and work spaces,” said Mary Ceruti, executive director of SculptureCenter. “She’s highly responsive to site, content, and material. That will serve us well given the nature of the existing building.” Other finalists in the competition were Deborah Berke, Diller + Scofidio, Specht Harpman Design, and

  • news August 01, 2001

    CAI GUO-QIANG WITHDRAWS WORK FROM PARRISH SHOW

    CAI GUO-QIANG WITHDRAWS WORK FROM PARRISH SHOW

    Chinese-born artist Cai Guo-Qiang refused to alter his proposal for a new installation set to debut last week in “About the Bayberry Bush,” an exhibition of work by twelve contemporary artists commissioned by the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, NY. Guest curators Ingrid Schaffner and Melissa Feldman asked the artists, who also include Peter Doig, Bonnie Collura, Lee Mingwei, Joan Jonas, and Joseph Grigely, to create works in response to a popular nineteenth-century painting entitled The Bayberry Bush, 1895, by American Impressionist William Merritt Chase. Cai proposed a room-size installation

  • news July 31, 2001

    POTENTIAL NEA CHIEF WINS FRIENDS AND FOES

    POTENTIAL NEA CHIEF WINS FRIENDS AND FOES

    Since National Endowment for the Arts chairman William Ivey announced earlier this year that he plans to step down from his post in September, the Bush administration has been searching for a replacement. A leading contender is Roy Goodman, a liberal Republican state senator in New York who worked for the NEA in George Bush Sr.’s administration. Leading cultural figures have been quick to declare their endorsement of Goodman. Philippe de Montebello, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the institution’s president, David E. McKinney, have cowritten a letter to the White House praising

  • news July 26, 2001

    SF MoMA MOUNTS SHOW OUTSIDE THE WHITE CUBE

    SF MoMA MOUNTS SHOW OUTSIDE THE WHITE CUBE

    Mounting an exhibition outside the confines of the white cube can be fraught with unpredictable challenges and dangers, as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (www.sfmoma.org) recently discovered in organizing “Revelatory Landscapes,” the institution’s first offsite outdoor exhibition. On view through October 14, the show features work by five landscape designers whose installations are hybrids of traditional landscape architecture and contemporary land art, with a nod to the Earth Art movement of the ’60s and ’70s. According to Leah Levy, an independent curator who co-organized the exhibition

  • news July 25, 2001

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    FRANK GEHRY REVEALS MODEL AND NEW INSPIRATION: After recently unveiling his design for the Ohr-O’Keeffe Museum of Art in Biloxi, MS, architect Frank Gehry announced that his future museum plans—including those for the Guggenheim branch in lower Manhattan—may be influenced by the more intimate structures he created for the Ohr-O’Keeffe. Gehry set the $16 million, 25,000-square-foot museum as a series of five smaller buildings (dedicated, respectively, to contemporary art, African-American art, the work of the nineteenth-century Mississippi ceramicist George Ohr, administrative offices, and

  • news July 24, 2001

    APEX ART SELECTS CURATORS AND HOSTS CONFERENCE IN BRAZIL

    APEX ART SELECTS CURATORS AND HOSTS CONFERENCE IN BRAZIL

    The Apex Art (www.apexart.org) curatorial program for the 2001-2002 season has recently been finalized. In September the seven-year-old nonprofit space known for its unconventional exhibitions will host an exhibition by Venezuelan-born independent curator Euridice Arratia about modern sports fandom. In October, Spanish writer and curator Montse Badia will present works that deal with the conflict between public and private space. In January, Kelly Taxter , a digital musician and former director of the DNA gallery in Provincetown, MA, will devote an exhibition to artists who modify everyday

  • news July 18, 2001

    WEISS/MANFREDI TO DESIGN SEATTLE MUSEUM'S NEW SCULPTURE PARK

    WEISS/MANFREDI TO DESIGN SEATTLE MUSEUM'S NEW SCULPTURE PARK

    The Seattle Art Museum recently announced that it has selected Weiss/Manfredi Architects, a New York-based firm, to design its new $60 million, six-acre Olympic Sculpture Park, scheduled to open in mid-2004. The park will be located on waterfront property in Belltown, a densely populated Seattle neighborhood.

    “We feel that Weiss/Manfredi has a fresh vision,” says Mimi Gardner Gates, director of the Seattle Art Museum. “They are capable of creating a public space within an urban landscape with great environmental sensitivity.”

    Weiss/Manfredi, a twelve-year-old firm led by Marion Weiss and Michael

  • news July 17, 2001

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    NATIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

    TWO NEW SENIOR POSTS FILLED AT BMA: After a national search, the Brooklyn Museum of Art (BMA) (www.brooklynart.org) has named Marc Mayer, currently director of the Power Plant Art Gallery in Toronto, Canada, as deputy director for contemporary art. Prior to his position at the Power Plant, Mayer was curator of contemporary art at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. Mayer has curated numerous exhibitions, including solo shows of Candida Höfer, Jessica Stockholder, and Bill Viola. In addition, the BMA’s longtime senior curator of decorative arts, Kevin Stayton, whose recent credits

  • news July 12, 2001

    NASA'S ART PROGRAM GOING STRONG

    NASA'S ART PROGRAM GOING STRONG

    Last year, when the Guggenheim mounted its Nam June Paik retrospective, one installation, The Moon Is the Oldest TV, 1976, stood out for being both poetic and technically refined—and appropriately so: It was commissioned by NASA. Surprisingly, this kind of collaboration between the US government’s space agency and a well-known contemporary artist isn’t all that new. For thirty years, NASA has been recruiting the likes of Mike and Doug Starn, William Wegman, Annie Liebovitz, Chakaia Booker, and, if negotiations go as planned, Mariko Mori, to create space-specific art for the NASA Art Program (

  • news July 08, 2001

    HOUSTON MUSEUMS SUSTAIN DAMAGE IN FLOODS

    HOUSTON MUSEUMS SUSTAIN DAMAGE IN FLOODS

    In June, tropical storm Allison pummeled Houston, Texas, flooding more than 27,000 homes, killing twenty-two people, and prompting stories in local and national media fearing that valuable art had been destroyed in the city’s major museums, which were reported to have been “flooded.” While these stories may have been somewhat exaggerated, many of the city's major museums did sustain water damage and were forced to close.

    The worst hit was the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (CAMH, www.camh.org), which shut its doors on June 10 and will reopen July 13, in time for its members' preview of the