Reena Jana

  • news May 25, 2001

    NATIONAL ROUNDUP

    NATIONAL ROUNDUP

    FINALISTS SELECTED TO REDESIGN CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART: Michael J. Horvitz, president of the Cleveland Museum of Art (www.clemusart.com), announced that six internationally renowned architecture firms have been chosen as finalists from a list of sixty-three to design the expansion and renovation of the institution: Beyer Blinder Belle (New York; Washington, DC); Foster and Partners (London, Berlin, Singapore); Frank O. Gehry & Associates (Santa Monica, CA); Pei Cobb Freed & Partners (New York); Rafael Viñoly Architects (New York); and David M. Schwarz/Architectural Services (Washington, DC; Fort

  • news May 23, 2001

    WALKER SET TO EXPAND

    WALKER SET TO EXPAND

    There’s a reason the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis isn’t called a “museum,” says the institution’s director, Kathy Halbreich. Recently unveiled plans for the center’s $90 million expansion may well indicate why. Designed by this year’s Pritzker Prize winner, Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron, the team behind the Tate Modern, the plan allots only 15,000 out of the 100,000 square feet being added to the building to galleries. Hence, though it will almost double the size of the museum, little new space will be available for exhibitions. “Our idea is to create a destination that isn’t

  • news May 22, 2001

    THE NEA TAPES, THE MOVIE

    THE NEA TAPES, THE MOVIE

    Sounds like the cast of an unlikely movie: Karen Finley and Andres Serrano costarring with the founder of the Christian Action Network, Martin Mawyer, and New York City mayor Rudolf Giuliani in a supporting role. But they all share screen time in the hour-long documentary film The NEA Tapes, which has been shown on the Bravo network and at a screening at Pace Wildenstein in New York. Its creators, New York artists Paul Lamarre and Melissa Wolf, are entering the documentary in film festivals this year with the hope of garnering a theatrical release.

    To continue building momentum for the movie,

  • news May 21, 2001

    TIMOTHY SMITH NAMED NEW ARMORY MANAGING DIRECTOR

    TIMOTHY SMITH NAMED NEW ARMORY MANAGING DIRECTOR

    Timothy H. Smith, a former investment banker and dot-com executive, has just been named managing director of the Armory Show.

    Smith readily admits that his knowledge of the business and milieu of contemporary art stems primarily from his decade-long residence in West Chelsea—a fact, he says, that points to his understanding of that neighborhood's evolution into an art-world epicenter. Prior to his new post, he managed the New York office of AgEx.com, an online commodities exchange. Previously, he was executive vice president of the Manhattan Group, an investment banking firm.

    “Anyone who remembers

  • news May 17, 2001

    MATTHEW DRUTT JOINS THE MENIL COLLECTION

    MATTHEW DRUTT JOINS THE MENIL COLLECTION

    Matthew Drutt has been appointed Chief Curator of the Menil Collection (www.menil.org) in Houston, Texas. Drutt, 38, arrives from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (www.guggenheim.org) in New York, where he has been responsible for collection-based projects and publications since 1993. The appointment comes less than three months after the Guggenheim hired Walter Hopps as an adjunct senior curator of twentieth-century art, and may answer questions about the direction of the Menil in the wake of Hopps’ semi-departure (since he actually retains his position at the Menil as well). “The Menil is a

  • news May 15, 2001

    YVONNE FORCE A FORCE IN ART WORLD

    YVONNE FORCE A FORCE IN ART WORLD

    First she helped Vanessa Beecroft bring Valkyrie-like models wearing Gucci stilettos and nothing else into the Guggenheim museum. Now Yvonne Force Villareal has brought twenty-one biomorphic lamps by conceptual artist Jorge Pardo into the nine-story-high glass atrium of Sotheby’s new uptown headquarters. It’s the first in an ongoing series of noncommercial site-specific installations produced by the auction behemoth in collaboration with the three-person Art Production Fund (www.artproductionfund.org), the nonprofit organization Force Villareal launched last year to produce and support art

  • news May 14, 2001

    MADOFF BECOMES DIRECTOR OF MoMA’S WEBSITE

    MADOFF BECOMES DIRECTOR OF MoMA’S WEBSITE

    Steven Henry Madoff’s dual identity as art journalist and Internet executive may be perfect for his new position as president and editorial director of the Museum of Modern Art’s impending commercial website. Madoff, former executive editor of Art News, ex–editorial director of Time, Inc.’s Web properties (and frequent Artforum contributor), was hired for the position after spending several months as a consultant advising MoMA director Glenn D. Lowry on how to build a for-profit site. Originally, the project was to be jointly operated with London’s Tate Gallery, but the Tate and MoMA suddenly

  • news May 11, 2001

    GUGGENHEIM LAUNCHES ONLINE VENTURE

    GUGGENHEIM LAUNCHES ONLINE VENTURE

    Remember when a museum’s website consisted only of calendar listings and press releases? In addition to the recent announcement of a for-profit website, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is upping the ante even further by launching the Guggenheim Collection Online (www.guggenheimcollection.org), which features hundreds of works from the New York Guggenheim’s permanent collection alongside commentary by the museum’s curators. The digitized offerings range from the earliest work in the collection—The Hermitage at Pontoise, an 1867 landscape by Camille Pissarro—to the 1994 painting Throbbing

  • news May 10, 2001

    DILLER + SCOFIDIO TO BUILD NEW ICA IN BOSTON

    DILLER + SCOFIDIO TO BUILD NEW ICA IN BOSTON

    The New York architecture firm Diller + Scofidio has been selected to design the new Institute of Contemporary Art (www.icaboston.org) in Boston scheduled to open in 2004. The ICA's board of trustees selected the husband-and-wife team in April from a shortlist that included Boston's Office dA, Iceland's Studio Granda, and Switzerland's Peter Zumthor. “We're thrilled to have selected an American firm that hasn't built much,” states Jill Medvedow, director of the ICA. “We weren't looking for one at the pinnacle of its career. We tried to identify an architectural firm likely to win future honors

  • Biennial Angst

    Does the world really need another every-other-year contemporary art exhibition? The Palm Pilots of peripatetic curators, critics, collectors, and artists are already overloaded with dates of departure to Venice, Havana, and Kwangju. Now, add Valencia—the Spanish city best known for its oranges and its annual pyromaniacal tradition of burning giant papier-mache sculptures in the streets. The first Bienal de Valencia will open June 13 and remain on view through October 20.

    Luigi Settembrini, director of the new biennial, plans to create a citywide “spectacle” loosely inspired by the Passions

  • news May 01, 2001

    NEA CHIEF STEPS DOWN

    NEA CHIEF STEPS DOWN

    Bill Ivey, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (arts.endow.gov), has announced that, as of September 30, 2001, he will be stepping down—eight months before the end of his four-year term.

    Appointed by President Clinton in 1998, Ivey wouldn't comment directly on his decision. Instead, he released a statement in which he stated that he hoped “the new administration will be able to move efficiently to choose new leadership for the Arts Endowment.” Ivey added that he will work with Congress to complete the budget appropriations process for the next fiscal year.

    It's not unusual for appointees

  • Ronald Jones

    ASKED TO DESCRIBE the curriculum he's devising as Pasadena's Art Center College of Design's new (and first) provost, Ronald Jones chooses the term “transdisciplinary” over “interdisciplinary.” “Trans,” after all, implies permeation and specifies an approach that Jones says best reflects today's fluid culture.

    “What we're beginning to look at very seriously at Art Center is what Greenberg suggested in 'Avant-Garde and Kitsch': that art will be absorbed into entertainment,” says Jones. And what better place to contemplate the sunny manifestations of Greenberg's dark prophecy than Southern California?