Robin Kelsey

  • “Walker Evans: Depth of Field”

    While America fractures under the pressure of the latest presidential election, the High Museum is revisiting a photographic practice that subjected the nation to a brilliantly sensitive aesthetic conscience. Featuring more than 120 black-and-white and color prints, spanning from the 1920s to the 1970s, the show and attendant catalogue will give viewers a chance to revisit the dogged intelligence of a lifetime’s hard poetry. Evans had few peers in his capacity to disclose social relations through images and to coax the slow violence of

  • Michael Fried’s Why Photography Matters . . .

    WHY PHOTOGRAPHY MATTERS

    AS ART AS NEVER BEFORE
    , BY

    MICHAEL FRIED.
    NEW HAVEN, CT:

    YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2008.

    410 PAGES. $55.

    IN THE INTRODUCTION TO HIS LATEST BOOK, Michael Fried bemoans the “facile criticism” that he is “excessively preoccupied” with his own ideas. The proper test, he suggests, is not the frequency with which he has deployed notions such as beholding, theatricality, absorption, and embodiment across different moments in modern art but whether the resulting interpretations are convincing. Then he throws down a gauntlet: “I know it is too much to ask,” he writes, “but it would