Sabine Breitwieser

  • CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN

    “WE ARE GOING TO WORK TOGETHER,” she would tell me self-assuredly, whenever we met on various occasions. I often ran into her in New York, whether on the streets or at Electronic Arts Intermix, where she was perpetually, or so it seemed, editing the video of her 1964 performance Meat Joy. In the 1990s and 2000s, when I was a young curator beginning to explore experimental cinema and radical art by women, and later during my time as director of the Generali Foundation in Vienna, Carolee Schneemann was always on my mind. My earliest exposure to her work was Fuses, 1964–67, a silent 16-mm film shot

  • Sabine Breitwieser

    SABINE BREITWIESER

    1 “Isa Genzken: Open, Sesame!” (Whitechapel Gallery, London, and Ludwig Museum, Cologne) It has already been almost ten years since Genzken added antennae to a model of Philip Johnson’s AT&T Building in New York—putting a cuckold’s horns on the architect’s commercialized reaction to Miesian modernism (Deutsche Bank Proposal, 2000)—and yet the artist is still unrivaled in the courage she demonstrates in continually and radically rethinking her practice. When the shock and controversy that follows each new body of work dies down, what remains is the consensus that she

  • Sabine Breitwieser

    SABINE BREITWIESER

    1 “. . . for the Osmotic Compensation of the Pressure of Wealth. Alice Creischer: Works and Collaborations” (Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona) Several recent exhibitions allow for confidence that an artistic offensive is under way that addresses today’s politically virulent global issues. In Creischer’s midcareer survey—whose subtitle reminds us of her preferred mode of production—objects and collages were brought together in what could be termed “scenic” multimedia installations, deploying a visual and textual language whose philosophical discursiveness functions