Sanda Miller

  • EXCUSE ME MADAME BUT IT SEEMS TO ME UNLESS I’M MISTAKEN THAT I’VE MET YOU SOMEWHERE BEFORE

    IN JANUARY, EUGENE LONESCO’S most recent play, Voyages chez les morts, received its premiere, at the Riverside Studios in London, at the same time that his first one. La Cantatrice chauve, was running in Paris at the Theatre de la Huchette, where it has played continuously to full houses for thirty years, in a double bill with his La Leçon. Not far away, at the Théâtre de Poche Montparnasse, was a fourth piece, Amédée ou comment s’en débarrasser, along with an exhibition of the author’s recent paintings. Clearly, lonesco’s early work has kept its interest for modem audiences, while he has

  • Constantin Brancusi’s Photographs

    READILY ACKNOWLEDGED AS ONE of the great sculptors of this century, Constantin Brancusi the photographer is less widely known. Paradoxically enough, Brancusi’s output in sculpture is relatively small, comprising only some 215 known works. At least 40 of these—mainly from his early period—have since disappeared or been destroyed, and are known only from photographs.1 It can almost be said that, given the long span of his life, he endeavored to follow Rodin’s advice, “. . . Above all don’t work too quickly,”2 throughout his career. He did leave, however, a very impressive number of photographs: