Siegfried Gohr

  • FAUTRIER: THROUGH PAINT, ALONE

    WHEN THE FRENCH PAINTER Jean Fautrier died, in 1964, his exhibition record stretched back to the late ’20s, and included three substantial shows—in 1945, in 1957, and a large retrospective in the year of his death. He had won the grand prize at the biennales of Venice and Tokyo in 1960 and 1961 respectively, and writers such as Jean Paulhan, Francis Ponge, André Malraux, and Giuseppe Ungaretti had all contributed to the body of criticism that addressed him. And yet, despite this attention, and a 1980 retrospective of his work that I curated at the Cologne Kunsthalle, Fautrier’s achievement today

  • IN THE ABSENCE OF HEROES: THE EARLY WORK OF GEORG BASELITZ

    THERE HAS NEVER BEEN an ongoing tradition of painters in Germany. It took Albrecht Dürer a great deal of energy and effort to overcome the narrow mentality of the medieval guilds; he was the first artist to establish an identity for the artist in the consciousness of the public, yet that identity was unable to sustain itself as a cultural tradition. In Adam Elsheimer Germany produced another painter of European significance, but the numerous talented artists who emerged in the early 19th century fought and lost the battle against Goethe’s unsensual idealist concept of art. German Romantic