Sol Yurick

  • THE AUCTION

    WHAT LEAD TO THE STOCK market’s sudden depression of prices on October 19, 1987? Was Black Monday a glimpse into final chaos and collapse: a financial nova—or something else?

    In the monographs, textbooks, and long analytic articles that would be written about it, many invoking the panic and mania of similar traumas—the bursting of the South Sea and Mississippi bubbles in the 18th century, the crash of 1873, Black Thursday of 1907, and, of course, the apocalypse of ’29—two major schools of analysts emerged. The ecotastrophists (who based their thought on chaos and catastrophe theory) maintained

  • Popular Culture and High Culture: An Analysis and Evaluation of Taste

    Herbert Gans, Popular Culture and High Culture: An Analysis and Evaluation of Taste (New York, Basic Books, 1975), 179 pages.

    SOCIAL SCIENTISTS, SINCE THEY CAN’T handle all the variables of the real world, often employ all-encompassing theories of the world. To test out their theories they send out intelligence agents with their sampling techniques and questionnaires which contain the answers in the questions, and readjust their theories . . . minimally. On the one hand, cultural sociologists question the artist to find out how he or she does it; on the other hand they question the consumers of