Suzanne Hudson

  • Chris Burden

    Of all the art clamoring for attention in New York this fall, the most incisively current was a thing of the past. Chris Burden’s early work has a purchase on the contemporary in ways that are both revealing and overdetermined, making unmistakably clear that the history we thought we had transcended is still the long present in which we are mired. Conceived against a backdrop of inept and insidious foreign policy in Vietnam and the ceaseless televisual spectacle its insurrections set in motion, Burden’s work finds an eerie analogue in the sectarian violence of our own era of equivocation bereft

  • Fred Wilson

    Already in the early ’90s, certain critics were balking at Fred Wilson’s museum interventions and his peculiar brand of materialist historicism, levying charges that the artist’s finger-pointing politics were not only too overt but, worse still, passé. While some argued that Wilson preached to a choir of self-congratulatory art world impresarios who surely knew better than to champion whitewashed narratives of art, or to revel in the power of institutions apart from that bestowed in inverse relation to the sanctimoniousness of their critique, Wilson’s work nevertheless raised discomfiting

  • Yang Fudong

    In the second installment of his ongoing film pentalogy Seven Intellectuals in Bamboo Forest, Yang Fudong’s latter-day sages forsake the Taoist natural paradise of Yellow Mountain for a seductively quotidian Shanghai apartment complex as they divine their place in an emergent global economy.

    In the second installment of his ongoing film pentalogy Seven Intellectuals in Bamboo Forest, Yang Fudong’s latter-day sages forsake the Taoist natural paradise of Yellow Mountain for a seductively quotidian Shanghai apartment complex as they divine their place in an emergent global economy. Premiering in Chicago, the film will be screened alongside part 1 of the series and three other works, among them his 2002 feature film An Estranged Paradise. Taken together, they should offer a sustained panorama of the longings of an artist who is part traditional lyricist evoking the enigmatic subtlety

  • Byron Kim

    Byron Kim’s exquisitely subjective monochromes are suspended between the reflective, heady abstraction of Reinhardt, Marden, and Rothko and the deft, politically incisive Conceptualism of Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Glenn Ligon.

    Byron Kim’s exquisitely subjective monochromes are suspended between the reflective, heady abstraction of Reinhardt, Marden, and Rothko and the deft, politically incisive Conceptualism of Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Glenn Ligon. Alternately indexing skin, Korean celadon pottery, a station wagon, and even a Brooklyn public pool, his paintings will be shown to great effect in his first major solo museum exhibition. Against the BAM’s neo-brutalist architecture, the hazy atmospheric surface effects of these thirty-two works should betray an unbearable lightness of being.

  • Faces in the Crowd

    Refusing a formalist privileging of abstraction and autonomy, the artists constellated here—a who’s who from Picasso to Heartfield, Warhol to Sherman—have recourse to the figure.

    Like a good modernist, this show starts squarely with Manet, but like an even better deconstructionist, its roughly sixty works in various media propose alternate histories of this well-traversed terrain. Refusing a formalist privileging of abstraction and autonomy, the artists constellated here—a who’s who from Picasso to Heartfield, Warhol to Sherman—have recourse to the figure. A comprehensive catalogue-cum-anthology penned by such contributors as Ester Coen, Charles Harrison, Jill Lloyd, Robert Storr, and exhibiting artist Jeff Wall accompanies the show. An imaging of the social in many

  • “Establishing Shot”

    In filmic terms, “establishing shot” refers to the opening sequence of a scene, the images that spatially orient the audience and anchor subsequent events. Often a wide shot, or literally a long shot, it sets the location, characters, and mood of what follows, thus becoming a crucial—if often stymied (intentionally or otherwise)—point of narrative reference. At once an incipient lexicon of possibilities and a limit set within which such possibilities might arise, the singular, presumably intelligible establishing shot is really only legible within the resultant narrative sequence. Thus it often

  • “The Art of Science”

    In light of recent art-historical obsessions with technology, information theory, vision, and modes of attention—not to mention our acute cultural preoccupation with all things scientific—it is perhaps unsurprising that the ICP has devoted a number of shows to such topical themes. Eugenics, genetics, and the discovery of DNA all figured prominently in past installments of its five-show series “Imaging the Future: The Intersection of Science, Technology, and Photography,” curated by Carol Squiers. Even so, this final show managed to astonish in a way that its predecessors did not. Tucked away in

  • Roni Horn

    For Roni Horn’s show, over eighty photographs of the eponymous river in her ongoing Some Thames are installed in a lateral sequence coursing through the Art Institute’s public spaces (collection and exhibition galleries) and private recesses (the library and administrative offices).

    For Roni Horn’s show, over eighty photographs of the eponymous river in her ongoing Some Thames are installed in a lateral sequence coursing through the Art Institute’s public spaces (collection and exhibition galleries) and private recesses (the library and administrative offices). On view in its entirety for the first time in the US, the series is accompanied by Saying Water, Horn’s slide show and performance comprising visual and historical anecdotes relating to the Thames. Here, the dark surface opacity of Some Thames’s mutable, oily material is penetrated by the