T. Jefferson Kline

  • film July 14, 2008

    Double Projection

    IT IS HARDLY SURPRISING that Alain Robbe-Grillet should have moved from his particular conception and practice of the French New Novel to the cinema. In literary works such as The Voyeur (1955) and Jealousy (1957), this nouveau romancier delighted in patterned descriptions of nature so plastic as to appear at first reading entirely devoid of any subjective point of view or psychology. In a series of essays ultimately collected under the title For a New Novel (1963), Robbe-Grillet argued for a view of the world that abjured interiority in favor of a formal, almost mechanical technique that looked

  • T. JEFFERSON KLINE

    IT IS HARDLY SURPRISING that Alain Robbe-Grillet should have moved from his particular conception and practice of the French New Novel to the cinema. In literary works such as The Voyeur (1955) and Jealousy (1957), this nouveau romancier delighted in patterned descriptions of nature so plastic as to appear at first reading entirely devoid of any subjective point of view or psychology. In a series of essays ultimately collected under the title For a New Novel (1963), Robbe-Grillet argued for a view of the world that abjured interiority in favor of a formal, almost mechanical technique that looked

  • A TRIBUTE TO ALAIN ROBBE-GRILLET (1922–2008)

    WITH THE PASSING of French novelist Alain Robbe-Grillet this winter, the world of postmodern literature lost one of its first (and last) great innovators—one whose influence extended irrevocably into the realms of theory, film, and art (and particularly its Conceptualist and Minimalist strands). Yet if the author was lauded at the very outset of his career by preeminent critics such as Roland Barthes, his near-programmatic commitment to both experimentation and provocation was such that his final legacy in life remains, perhaps, as enigmatic as the kaleidoscopic narratives he constructed