Tacita Dean

  • David Lean, Lawrence of Arabia, 1962, 35 mm, color, sound, 222 minutes.

    Tacita Dean

    ANYONE WHO WORKS WITH FILM, whether they shoot, project, or preserve it, will bear witness to the hitherto unimaginable speed and near-exhaustive prosecution with which the medium has been annihilated over the last half decade. The new digital technology inevitably excited and dominated the market with incentives and capitulations in equal measure, plunging film into probable economic extinction and an adversarial and defensive position with no chance of equivalence. “Old-fashioned,” “obsolete,” “dying”—“end-of-life technology”—became the ubiquitous fare of the press and the general

  • Brickmaking community outside of Guadalajara, Mexico, 2014. Photo: Oscar Murillo.

    The Best Exhibitions of 2014

    TO TAKE STOCK OF THE PAST YEAR, ARTFORUM ASKED AN INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF ARTISTS TO SELECT THE SINGLE IMAGE, EXHIBITION, OR EVENT THAT MOST MEMORABLY CAPTURED THEIR EYE IN 2014.

    OSCAR MURILLO

    KIM GORDON

    LORETTA FAHRENHOLZ

    Broad City is the first TV show to fully exploit the comic potential of the gentrification of our minds.

    WOLFGANG TILLMANS

    LAURE PROUVOST

    This is an image from a book on Ferdinand Cheval’s Palais Idéal (1912). My family was recently seeking architectural inspiration for a museum that will be built when our lost granddad comes out of his conceptual tunnel. It has now been more than

  • Tacita Dean, Edwin Parker, 2011, 16 mm, color, 26 minutes.

    Tacita Dean

    THE SURVIVAL OF FILM—photochemical, analog film—depends on it being understood as a medium within the industry that has historically and commercially used it the most: the cinema industry. As long as they continue to see it as part of the cycle of the production of pictures—the pictures—and therefore inevitably replaced as technology progresses and changes, then film will not survive. But if the industry (and by industry I do not mean the directors, cinematographers, and those behind the camera, but the mind-set and financial psychology of the industry as a whole) can begin

  • Tacita Dean

    AT THE END OF SEPTEMBER, the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt closed for renovation. Among its natural history displays and eclectic art collection are the seven rooms devoted to an installation by Joseph Beuys referred to, by the artist himself, as Block Beuys, 1970–86. The whole museum is being redeveloped, but it is the decision to remove the brown jute wall coverings and gray carpet of the Block Beuys rooms that has caused disquiet in so many quarters.

    The Landesmuseum is an old-fashioned cultural museum, and Block Beuys is to be found on the second floor. Before getting there, you can

  • Werner Herzog, Fata Morgana, 1971, still from a color film in 35 mm, 78 minutes.

    TRISTAN DA CUNHA

    I sit in urban safety imagining my journey to Tristan da Cunha. I have known about this island for many years, since studying the trade routes in the Southern Atlantic and the rough and fearsome seas of the roaring forties. They call it the remotest island on earth, because it is nearly two thousand miles off the nearest coast and only one boat goes there a year, out of the Cape of Good Hope. It is a volcano risen out of the ocean, where fewer than three hundred people still live, all descendents of the sea’s itinerants—the shipwrecked and the runaways and the naval loners restless at home. They

  • Matthew Buckingham, Amos Fortune Road, 1996, still from a black-and-white film in 16 mm, 21 minutes.

    HISTORICAL FICTION: THE ART OF MATTHEW BUCKINGHAM

    Matthew Buckingham is very interested in the land that is America, or rather, the old contested land that was to become America. He examines its natural and social legacies with a scrupulous and intelligent eye, often inviting his viewers to look at its history through the everyday: the ground they stand on, the signs they walk past, and the trees they sit under—even the birds do not evade his particular attention. In 1999, he videotaped himself in Manhattan’s Battery Park, trying to interview nonindigenous sparrows, which had been misguidedly imported into America in 1850 to cull a perceived

  • the best books of the year

    Linda Nochlin

    Two books very different in approach and subject matter stand out this year: Richard Meyer’s Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art (Oxford University Press) and Georges Didi-Huberman’s L’Image survivante: Histoire de l’art et temps des fantômes selon Aby Warburg (Editions de Minuit). Meyer deftly combines a close reading of individual works and intelligent social and political synthesis. Outlaw Representation not only sheds light on such important figures as Paul Cadmus, Andy Warhol, and Robert Mapplethorpe but demonstrates the remarkable