Vito Acconci

  • Chris Burden, Exposing the Foundation of the Museum, 1986, three excavations of earth. Installation view, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Photo: Squidds & Nunns.

    Chris Burden

    SPRING 1976: This would be my first time on the West Coast, my first time in LA.

    Art- and architecture-doers of my generation were seldom asked to go to other places in the US; we were asked to go instead to Western Europe. Dealers there knew they could bring us over on the cheap—we were the young ’uns who could be stored in second- and third-rate hotels, we took whatever we could get, we didn’t know any better. (Of course we knew better: We knew that Jasper Johns, e.g., was traveling in a different class than we were . . . )

    We were the generation that didn’t travel packed with art to sell,

  • Brickmaking community outside of Guadalajara, Mexico, 2014. Photo: Oscar Murillo.

    The Best Exhibitions of 2014

    TO TAKE STOCK OF THE PAST YEAR, ARTFORUM ASKED AN INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF ARTISTS TO SELECT THE SINGLE IMAGE, EXHIBITION, OR EVENT THAT MOST MEMORABLY CAPTURED THEIR EYE IN 2014.

    OSCAR MURILLO

    KIM GORDON

    LORETTA FAHRENHOLZ

    Broad City is the first TV show to fully exploit the comic potential of the gentrification of our minds.

    WOLFGANG TILLMANS

    LAURE PROUVOST

    This is an image from a book on Ferdinand Cheval’s Palais Idéal (1912). My family was recently seeking architectural inspiration for a museum that will be built when our lost granddad comes out of his conceptual tunnel. It has now been more than

  • THEIR FAVORITE EXHIBITIONS OF THE YEAR

    To take stock of the past year, Artforum contacted an international group of artists to find out which exhibitions were, in their eyes, the very best of 2006.

    AMY SILLMAN

    “Edvard Munch: The Modern Life of the Soul” (Museum of Modern Art, New York) In a rather cynical mode, I trudged uptown one day last spring to see the Munch show at MoMA for what I thought would be a cliché-ridden overview of Nordic gloom-goth. What I got instead was a hard punch to the gut: powerful color, radical ideas about the depiction of memory as space, paintings with emotional vanishing points rather than rational optical

  • PROJECTIONS OF HOME

    1. The beginning of John Ford's The Searchers: after title an credits on brick, a black ground appears with white text: “Texas 1868.” The text fades out, the screen goes black. Suddenly, a cut slices the ground, the black begins to open from the inside, a vertical rectangle in the middle of the horizontal screen, a landscape seen through that rectangle—and moving into that opening, a woman. She stands with her back to the camera, her back to us—she’s at a doorway, the opening in the black was the opening of a door, the black is the inside of the house, dark except for the light of the landscape