William Kaizen

  • Chris Marker

    Years before Chris Marker made his first film, he actively pursued still photography, and he spent much of his subsequent six-decade career engaged with a wide variety of media. Marker enthusiastically embraced analog-video synthesis in the 1970s and began experimenting with digitally altering images in the 1980s. In the last decades of his life, he published his work on CD-ROM, Flickr, and YouTube and built a museum in the virtual world Second Life dedicated to his oeuvre and influences. Split between the galleries at MIT and Harvard, the ambitious exhibition “Guillaume-en-Égypte”—which

  • Steve Locke

    The main motif in Steve Locke’s exhibition “There Is No One Left to Blame,” curated by Helen Molesworth, was the male head, sticking out its tongue in a gesture that’s half insouciant celebration and half angry fuck-you. Themes of masculinity and homosexuality, both important issues in the artist’s work, were certainly manifest in this exhibition, but color—in both its painterly and racial significance—was Locke’s main subject this time. The slipperiness of pigment, both on the surface of canvases and on bodies in the age of Obama, predominated. With portraits made for our purportedly

  • Nam June Paik

    THE CATALOGUE for “Nam June Paik: Global Visionary” opens by comparing the artist with Picasso, claiming that because of his prescience and influence, the former is to the second half of the twentieth century what the latter is to the first half. If retrospective exhibitions alone are any indicator of the accuracy of this claim, it rings true. While he was alive, Paik had four major museum retrospectives in the US and abroad and helped plan an art center outside Seoul dedicated to his work, which opened after his death in 2006. Since then, there have been several more museum exhibitions in

  • Stan VanDerBeek

    STAN VANDERBEEK remains best known for the experimental films he made during the 1950s and ’60s, which placed him at the forefront of avant-garde cinema. This first retrospective exhibition of VanDerBeek’s work, co-curated by João Ribas and Bill Arning, offers the chance to more broadly consider his visionary engagement with the postwar communications revolution. Indeed, seeing this much of his work together makes it seem both utterly contemporary and oddly quaint. VanDerBeek’s use of multiscreen projection and his transformation of the white cube of the modernist gallery into the black box that

  • Stan VanDerBeek: The Culture Intercom

    In recent years, Stan VanDerBeek’s role as a mixed-media visionary has been receiving increased recognition.

    In recent years, Stan VanDerBeek’s role as a mixed-media visionary has been receiving increased recognition. With this first museum survey, the artist finally gets his due as an expanded-cinema pioneer and a theorist of “culture-intercom”—his name for the global network emerging with the proliferation of screen-based technologies. Incorporating some one hundred works, the show includes VanDerBeek’s earliest Beat-inspired paintings and collages, his well-known collage films, his lesser known multiscreen works, and pieces that harness

  • Nam June Paik

    The most lauded of the video artists who began working in the medium at the very moment it emerged, Nam June Paik continues to fascinate us—or so his long string of recent retrospectives would suggest.

    The most lauded of the video artists who began working in the medium at the very moment it emerged, Nam June Paik continues to fascinate us—or so his long string of recent retrospectives would suggest. This exhibition is distinguished by its focus on Paik’s time in Germany, from his early years as a student of Stockhausen’s in the 1950s to his time teaching at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in the ’90s. Staging the German debut of several pieces, among some thirty in all, including a laser-cone installation from 1998 and eight different TV Buddhas of

  • “The Greenroom”

    THAT DOCUMENTARY is a kind of fiction is a truism today. But an aura of truth still hovers around the genre, despite its unavoidable manipulation. The artist Hito Steyerl has developed the term documentality to describe the kinds of truth—whether evidentiary, scientific, or journalistic—typically used to establish a shared reality, thereby lending authority to particular worldviews. In her own work, Steyerl aims to understand why some forms of documentary appear “truer” than others: She accords a special position to self-reflexive documentary films that, rather than asking viewers to take their