Mira Schor

John Berger (1926–2017)

Mira Schor on John Berger (1926–2017)

February 2017

IN A TIME OF POLITICAL TRAUMA, the ability to communicate complex ideas about history in language that is accessible to more than just the most highly educated and privileged is a rare gift. John Berger’s death at the age of ninety on the … READ ON

PASSAGES

Mira Schor

BOOKS: BEST OF 2014

December 2014

In Paul Chan’s 2006 documentary Untitled Video on Lynne Stewart and Her Conviction, the Law, and Poetry, former civil rights attorney Lynne Stewart reads from poems of special significance to her, by John Ashbery and William Blake, among … READ ON

IN PRINT December 2014 [TOC]

Robert Hughes and Hilton Kramer

PASSAGES

February 2013

Only by demonstrating that he is on the side of History—aware of the laws of its unfolding, able to reconcile the art he likes with those laws—can a critic rise to seriousness, for otherwise criticism is merely the expression of subjective … READ ON

IN PRINT February 2013 [TOC]

YOU CAN'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT

October 1991

SOMETIMES I WISH I COULD JUST PHONE HOME.  Recently a friend of mine couldn’t enjoy an evening out until she had called her five-year-old daughter. Another said that she understood completely: she sometimes longs to call up her cat. And I … READ ON

IN PRINT October 1991

the Return of the Same

TROUBLESHOOTERS

June 1990

UNTIL RECENTLY, there was no problem determining who were the subjects of history. They were the largely Caucasian males whose actions and thoughts were inscribed into a history whose very formulation as a science they defined. Discourse was… READ ON

IN PRINT Summer 1990

MEDUSA REDUX: IDA APPLEBROOG AND THE SPACES OF POST-MODERNITY

March 1990

THE FAVORED IMAGE of the artist in the 19th century was the flaneur. Ambling through the spaces of the “spectacular city . . . open to a class and gender-specific gaze,”1 this voyeur and participant in public entertainments—bars, brothels, … READ ON

IN PRINT March 1990

Remedios Varo

BOOKS

December 1989

SURREALISM, A MOVEMENT THAT valorized a “feminine” position while at the same time defining this position in traditional terms as irrational and unconscious, gave us Woman as no-longer-placid muse. But this Ophelia unbound took flight only … READ ON

IN PRINT December 1989