Postcommodity

Art in General
145 Plymouth Street
March 25, 2017–May 6, 2017

View of “Postcommodity: Coyotaje,” 2017.

In the thick velvet darkness of the gallery, a voice whispers, “oyes vengan acá.” Mounted wall speakers take turns asking us to “come over here” in Spanish, echoing the decoy tactics used by the US Border Patrol to seize migrants trying to cross over from Mexico under the blanket of night. On maps, boundaries appear as thin lines, but this exhibition places the audience inside the rich, textured, and opaque sliver of landscape between the communities of Douglas, Arizona, and Agua Prieta, Mexico.

The aforementioned sound work is half of the two-part installation Coyotaje, 2017—the title is a colloquial term used by Mexicans for people-smuggling. The second part of the piece consists of a giant inflatable monster wearing military night goggles, inspired by the chupacabra, a mythic vampire creature. The animal is illuminated only by the queasy green light of a closed-circuit television that captures images of gallery attendees and projects them back onto the body of the terrifying alien being. From a distance, border agents are very much like chupacabras—their glowing eyes give them away and instill fear.

The work of Postcommodity—an indigenous artist collective comprising Raven Chacon, Crístobal Martínez, and Kade L. Twist—consistently cracks open the bipartisan US narrative of the border to reveal a tangled web of microeconomies and competing desires. Since Richard Nixon declared the “war on drugs,” the US-Mexico landscape has been under increasing national scrutiny. Postcommodity responds to this escalating surveillance by imagining the edges of the nation-state as a conversation, not a cut.

— Katherine Brewer Ball