Leslie Hewitt

Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
530 West 22nd Street
April 7, 2017–May 13, 2017

Leslie Hewitt, Topologies (Fanon mildly out of focus), 2017, chromogenic print, 30 x 30".

Memories continually recalled take on a bleary specificity. A similar kind of dissonance suffuses Leslie Hewitt’s current exhibition, in which photographic still lifes of single objects betray the nuances and slippages needed to make meaning of both personal and social histories. On one wall, artifacts on top of hardwood and photographed from above build up subtle narratives through association and texture. Topologies (Fanon mildly out of focus), 2017, takes the dog-eared cover of the titular writer’s provocative anticolonial manifesto The Wretched of the Earth (1961) as its subject: “The handbook for the black revolution that is changing the shape of the world,” the paperback announces. Its apocalyptic ambience is offset by a gossamer cloth’s floral embroidery in Topologies (folded memory object), 2017. Nearby, four chromogenic prints of dahlias hang in a series titled “Color Study,” 2016. Their variations are sometimes imperceptible, though three photographs are black and white while one depicts the petals in vivacious yellow. All materialize against a backdrop of blackness, a nod, perhaps, to seventeenth-century bodegónes.

Gravelly footage of rippling waters, disco stars on Soul Train, and the fleeting Manhattan skyline—shot from a moving car’s window—appear in Hewitt’s video Static, 2017, which is also a part of IWIWT (Extended Break), 2017, a video collaboration with William Cordova, whose own exhibition runs concurrently with this one. Voices become incomprehensibly layered as imagery is punctuated by television snow. A photograph of a wooden Bible box with foliate carvings (RAM, 2017) appears in the gallery’s sparsest room. A slip of paper peeking from its lid reveals indecipherable handwriting. On the floor, a minimal, rectangular sculpture, Untitled, 2017, is held in place by oak joints, like a copper blueprint for a room in which we’ll never set foot. That the metal is an electrical conductor feels pertinent, but then again, it’s easy to read too much into Hewitt’s elliptical illegibility.

— Zack Hatfield