U.S. Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

Tania Pérez Córdova, Person A (detail), 2014, SIM card on ceramic, 17 3/4 × 15 1/8 × 1 1/2".

“Tania Pérez Córdova: Smoke, Nearby”

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, CHICAGO (MCA CHICAGO)
CHICAGO
Through August 20
Curated by José Esparza Chong Cuy

Mexican artist Tania Pérez Córdova’s first major museum show will occupy the entire south side of the MCA’s main-floor galleries and will feature work developed for the occasion in a “rephrasing” of previous works—a strategy in line with her sensitivity to the specificity of space. Pérez Córdova’s work explores the different durations embedded in an object over time, as well as the social or economic relations enacted in a sculptural form. Her works exist both in the gallery space and beyond it, and she grants her objects a parallel existence in their partial absence or in their incompleteness evinced, for example, by an earring hanging from a bronze frame, whose twin lives a separate life with its owner, or by six pairs of colored contact lenses (placed on a marble slab) identical to those worn by six of the artist’s friends. “Smoke, Nearby” promises to lend new visual readings to these intimately personal yet contextually contingent works.

Catalina Lozano

“DERRICK ADAMS: FUTURE PEOPLE”

STONY ISLAND ARTS BANK, REBUILD FOUNDATION
CHICAGO
Through September 18
Curated by Theaster Gates

In recent years, New York–based multidisciplinary artist Derrick Adams has become a key contributor to Afrofuturism’s second wave. In addition to presenting more general meditations on American popular culture, Adams’s work considers the forward movement of black people toward a freer future. Rebuild’s exhibition will present multiple works on paper that continue the artist’s recent engagements with media and futurity, and will showcase a new video and an opening-night performance. “Future People” will also capitalize on the Arts Bank’s many holdings, among them the Johnson Publishing Archive Collections, which includes photographs and materials related to Ebony and Jet magazines, and house-music progenitor Frankie Knuckles’s formidable record collection, which constitutes an essential history of black American music.

Jamillah James

Takashi Murakami, Klein’s Pot A, 1994–97, acrylic on canvas mounted on Masonite, 13 1/2 × 13 1/2".

“TAKASHI MURAKAMI: THE OCTOPUS EATS ITS OWN LEG”

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, CHICAGO (MCA CHICAGO)
CHICAGO
Through September 24
Curated by Michael Darling

Takashi Murakami is not just a leading interpreter of contemporary Japan’s unique collision of popular and traditional culture. His work and his persona are its very embodiment. Murakami brings to his paintings a knowledge of Japanese ukiyo-e wood-block prints and Kabuki theater, as well as an intimate engagement with nihonga painting (a discipline in which he holds a doctorate). Adapting traditional techniques and formats, Murakami fuses historical, political, and topical subject matter to forge singular contemporary canvases, some of the most ambitious of any contemporary artist. Nine of his astonishing mural-scale paintings, including the 2013 masterwork 100 Arhats, will be included in this show, but so too will many of his early abstract canvases from the 1980s and several new pieces. Dazzling in their detail and technical mastery and seductive in their Pop sensibility, Murakami’s paintings nevertheless offer a profound commentary on the darker side of human endeavor and create an unsettling fusion of past, present, and future. Travels to the Vancouver Art Gallery, January 2018; Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, June 2018. 

Jeffrey Deitch

Jorge Pedro Núñez, El sueño de una casa (Mari-Mari Rosado) (The Dream of a House [Mari-Mari Rosado]), 2011, collage on paper, 13 3/4 × 11 7/8". From “Home—So Different, So Appealing: Art from the Americas Since 1957.”

“HOME—SO DIFFERENT, SO APPEALING: ART FROM THE AMERICAS SINCE 1957”

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART (LACMA)
LOS ANGELES
Through October 15
Curated by Pilar Tompkins Rivas, Chon A. Noriega, and Mari Carmen Ramírez

Organized in collaboration with the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, this expansive exhibition will gather more than ninety works spanning seven decades by forty Latino and Latin American artists working in the US and abroad. The notion of home as a spatial—rather than sociological—parameter provides the curatorial premise for a show unconstrained by temporal boundaries, revealing the complexity of both the term and the experiences it frames. The exhibition and attendant catalogue encompass myriad reflections on domesticity, identity construction, and displacement and promise a wide range of perspectives to match the diversity of backgrounds of the represented artists, for whom home is both a lived reality and an idealized projection. Travels to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Nov. 19, 2017–Feb. 4, 2018.

Catalina Lozano

Markus Lüpertz, Arkadien—Der hohe Berg (Arcadia—The High Mountain), 2013, acrylic on canvas, 51 1/4 × 63 3/4".

MARKUS LÜPERTZ

HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN/PHILLIPS COLLECTION
WASHINGTON, DC
Through September 10
Curated by Evelyn Hankins and Dorothy Kosinski, respectively

America’s capital is the place to be this summer for aficionados of postwar German art as yet unfamiliar with the extraordinary and provocative oeuvre of Markus Lüpertz. After more than five decades slugging it out in the studio daily, the artist, now age seventy-five, is finally being accorded his first retrospective in America—and in two major museums to boot! While the Phillips will present a full-scale overview of his work made between the early 1960s and the present, the Hirshhorn will put on display dozens of the artist’s seminal early paintings from 1962 to 1975. Marking the first collaboration between the two institutions, these exhibitions share a common aim: to reveal just how deeply intertwined Lüpertz’s work is with German history, particularly the nightmare years between 1933 and 1945. Together the two shows are bound to be not just explosive but enlightening. 

Pamela Kort

Annabeth Rosen, Talley, 2011, ceramic, wire, steel, casters, 46 1/2 × 29 × 22".

“ANNABETH ROSEN: FIRED, BROKEN, GATHERED, HEAPED”

CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM HOUSTON
HOUSTON
Through November 26
Curated by Valerie Cassel Oliver

CAMH brings together more than two decades’ worth of Annabeth Rosen’s work in the prolific ceramicist’s first major survey. Eighty-some sculptures will be accompanied by forty works on paper, all reiterating the artist’s longtime method of composition: aggregating discrete forms to produce a cohesive whole. While the two-dimensional ground in her flat works unites myriad small shapes, Rosen’s three-dimensional pieces evidence a pragmatic engagement with the dynamics of gravity. Her small clay pieces are bound with wire or pressed together prior to firing, allowing the finished works to stand unsupported. Rosen has exhibited widely over the past thirty years, yet her work has never received the attention bestowed on peers such as Arlene Shechet. “Fired, Broken, Gathered, Heaped” and its attendant catalogue (featuring essays by critic Nancy Princenthal and scholar Jenni Sorkin) should do much to remedy the oversight.

Cat Kron