International Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

“MÉXICO MODERNO: VANGUARDIA Y REVOLUCIÓN”

MUSEO DE ARTE LATINOAMERICANO DE BUENOS AIRES (MALBA)
BUENOS AIRES
Through February 19, 2018
Curated by Sharon Jazzan, Ariadna Patiño Guadarrama, and Victoria Giraudo

Newly resurgent under the directorship of Agustín Pérez Rubio (who took the helm of the institution in 2014), MALBA presents “México Moderno: Vanguardia y Revolución,” a sweeping survey of artistic production in Mexico during the early twentieth century. Presenting more than 120 artworks (many of them loans), the exhibition focuses specifically on the ways in which artists—including many women—used visual expression as a means to codify a uniquely Mexican identity. The show will track the influence of four key forces: the emergence of early modernism in academies and via the European avant-garde; the dynamism of metropolitan life; the rise of popular politics, including indigenous movements; and the arrival of Mexican Surrealism. Expect to see masterpieces by such renowned artists as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo alongside lesser-known works by the Stridentists and practitioners of magical realism.  

Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy

Duane Hanson, Woman with a Laundry Basket, 1974, oil paint, cardboard, resin, talc, fiberglass, fabric, plastic, approx. 65 × 33 1/8 × 27 1/2". From “Hyper Real.”

“HYPER REAL”

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA
CANBERRA
Through February 18, 2018
Curated by Otto Letze and Jaklyn Babington

Since the late 1960s, sculptors around the world, including John De Andrea and Duane Hanson, have been creating eerily lifelike simulacra of human bodies, first through traditional techniques of modeling, casting, and the careful application of paint, and later by learning from the film industry’s special-effects fabricators in order to generate utterly fantastic, often digitally assisted visions of alternative realities. Featuring a provocatively diverse assortment of practices, this traveling exhibition tracks developments in hyperrealism over the past forty years, spotlighting artists ranging from Hanson and De Andrea to younger prodigies, including Ron Mueck and Sam Jinks, as well as seeming outliers such as Berlinde de Bruyckere. The show has been expanded significantly for its Australian debut—a fitting development, given the easily forgotten enthusiasm with which artists in that country took to hyperrealism. Travels to Kunsthal Rotterdam Mar.–July 2018.

Charles Green

Paul Klee, Wald-Hexen (Forest Witches), 1938, oil on paper on burlap, 39 × 29 1/8".

“10 AMERICAN ARTISTS: AFTER PAUL KLEE” and “PAUL KLEE: THE ABSTRACT DIMENSION”

ZENTRUM PAUL KLEE BERN, SWITZERLAND
BERN, SWITZERLAND
Through January 7, 2018
Curated by Fabienne Eggelhöfer

FONDATION BEYELER BASEL, SWITZERLAND
BASEL, SWITZERLAND
October 1–January 21, 2018
Curated by Anna Szech

Two exhibitions in Switzerland will focus on favorite son and noncitizen Paul Klee. Eggelhöfer picks ten American painters (including Jackson Pollock and Norman Lewis) who borrowed from the endlessly inventive European when “almost everybody, whether conscious of it or not, was learning from Klee,” as Clement Greenberg wrote. Eggelhöfer’s exhibition will emphasize how Klee’s prizing of process served as a resource for others—often for making paintings that resembled his very little. Among other things, many of these artists wanted to learn how to deal with abstraction as a porous way of working, one not at all opposed to representation. The Beyeler’s show will stress this aspect of Klee’s sprawling oeuvre, from mock–De Stijl grids to invented hieroglyphs. “10 American Artists” travels to the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Feb. 3–May 6, 2018.

Annie Bourneuf

Matthew Plummer-Fernandez, Material Want (detail), 2016. Rendering. From “Open Codes: Living in Digital Worlds.”

“OPEN CODES: LIVING IN DIGITAL WORLDS”

ZKM | CENTER FOR ART AND MEDIA
KARLSRUHE, GERMANY
Through August 5, 2018
Curated by Peter Weibel

Organized by ZKM in collaboration with multiple German research institutes, this historical survey traces the developments in math and physics that led to the invention of digital code, ushering in the many technologies that shape our culture and society today. Spanning three hundred years, the show places scientific and technological documents and artifacts in conversation with artworks, suggesting an affinity—if not a direct connection—between the ways in which these objects frame the world. The stakes of this interdisciplinarity are high: Over the past several years, many have argued for new media art’s inclusion in mainstream contemporary art discourse (for example, by pointing to new media’s fundamental interactivity as proof of its kinship with relational aesthetics). Provocatively, “Open Codes” promises to swing the pendulum back, grounding its objects as much in the history of technology as in the history of art.

Tina Rivers Ryan

Jorge Pinheiro, Untitled, 1968, oil on wood, 76 5/8 × 58 5/8".

JORGE PINHEIRO

SERRALVES MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART
PORTO, PORTUGAL
Through January 7, 2018
Curated by Pedro Cabrita Reis

There is no doubt that Jorge Pinheiro occupies a singular place in the history of Portuguese art since 1950, but observers differ in their characterizations of the nature of his achievement and the greatest strengths of his work. He deploys both figuration and abstraction in his art, intermingling those two modes in complex ways to generate works that are strikingly diverse in appearance, yet united by a systematic austerity. More than eighty such paintings, drawings, and sculptures will be on view in this retrospective, which terms itself historical but also includes a new sculpture conceived for the museum, and is curated by artist and Pinheiro enthusiast Pedro Cabrita Reis, with installation design by architect Eduardo Souto de Moura.
Translated from Portuguese by Clifford E. Landers    

Alexandre Melo

Hassan Sharif, Jumping No. 1, 1983, seven C-prints on cardboard, 38 5/8 × 28 7/8".

“HASSAN SHARIF: I AM THE SINGLE WORK ARTIST”

SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION
SHARJAH
Through February 3, 2018
Curated by Hoor Al Qasimi

International attention came late in life for Sharif, who was born in Iran, studied in London, established numerous community arts organizations in Sharjah and Dubai, and passed away last fall at sixty-five. He is routinely celebrated as the godfather of Conceptual art in the Gulf—a region the art-historical mainstream rarely recognizes as a place of formal innovation, critical thinking, or noncommercial gestures. But most recent shows of Sharif’s work (including his current showcase in Christine Macel’s Venice Biennale) have largely elided his early dematerialized practice—which included performances, urban archaeology projects, and works on paper described as “semi-systems”—and instead emphasized his vast, accumulative bundles of stuff, which he began to produce in the 1980s. This retrospective promises to correct those omissions and also to pay adequate attention to his role as teacher, critic, and translator.  

Kaelen Wilson-Goldie