U.S. Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

Annabeth Rosen, Talley, 2011, ceramic, wire, steel, casters, 46 1/2 × 29 × 22".

“ANNABETH ROSEN: FIRED, BROKEN, GATHERED, HEAPED”

CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM HOUSTON
HOUSTON
Through November 26
Curated by Valerie Cassel Oliver

CAMH brings together more than two decades’ worth of Annabeth Rosen’s work in the prolific ceramicist’s first major survey. Eighty-some sculptures will be accompanied by forty works on paper, all reiterating the artist’s longtime method of composition: aggregating discrete forms to produce a cohesive whole. While the two-dimensional ground in her flat works unites myriad small shapes, Rosen’s three-dimensional pieces evidence a pragmatic engagement with the dynamics of gravity. Her small clay pieces are bound with wire or pressed together prior to firing, allowing the finished works to stand unsupported. Rosen has exhibited widely over the past thirty years, yet her work has never received the attention bestowed on peers such as Arlene Shechet. “Fired, Broken, Gathered, Heaped” and its attendant catalogue (featuring essays by critic Nancy Princenthal and scholar Jenni Sorkin) should do much to remedy the oversight.

Cat Kron

Mona Hatoum, Cells (detail), 2014, zinc-plated steel, glass, 54 × 48 × 25".

“MONA HATOUM: TERRA INFIRMA”

THE MENIL COLLECTION
HOUSTON
October 13 - February 25, 2018
Curated by Michelle White

Mona Hatoum has spent her nearly forty-year career sharpening the edges of the everyday. The London- and Berlin-based artist was a signal figure in the turn toward a conception of both the bodily and the domestic as sites of political complexity and psychic menace that stretched across the 1980s and 1990s; this exhibition will be her first major museum survey in the US in two decades, showcasing some thirty sculptures and installations, including such signature works as the electrified household space of Homebound, 2000. In recognition of the often uncanny estrangements produced by Hatoum’s work, the show will be accompanied by a concurrent exhibition of objects, selected in consultation with the artist, from the Menil’s important collection of Surrealist work. A catalogue featuring essays by White, Anna Chave, Adania Shibli, and Rebecca Solnit will be published. Travels to the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Saint Louis, Apr. 6–Aug. 11, 2018. 

Jeffrey Kastner

Digital rendering of Theaster Gates’s sculpture Black Vessel for a Saint, 2017, as it will be installed in the Walker Art Center/Minneapolis Sculpture Garden.

MINNEAPOLIS SCULPTURE GARDEN

WALKER ART CENTER
MINNEAPOLIS
Curated by Olga Viso

After a year of extensive renovation, a transformed Minneapolis Sculpture Garden opens in June with the aim of tying the garden, built by Edward Larrabee Barnes in 1971, to the Walker Art Center via a new plaza, entrance, and expanded lobby, all designed by HGA Architects and Engineers. While Barnes based his garden on extant European examples, HGA has instead emphasized the flora of the region, employing native plants and trees and using environmentally sustainable materials and building practices.Beloved fixtures of the original garden, such as Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen’s Spoonbridge and Cherry, 1985–88, will keep company with more recently acquired pieces by American and European artists, including a spectacular new iteration of Katharina Fritsch’s Hahn/Cock, 2013/ 2016, originally commissioned for the Fourth Plinth in London’s Trafalgar Square.

Anne M. Wagner

“LAURE PROUVOST: THEY ARE WAITING FOR YOU”

WALKER ART CENTER
MINNEAPOLIS
October 12 - February 11, 2018
Curated by Victoria Sung with Gwyneth Shanks

The great seduction of Laure Prouvost’s work is rooted in the slippage of language, amid the perils and joys of communication and misunderstanding. Her lush and bewildering films distort conventional narrative to such a degree that they can be hard to follow, but the intensity of her voice-overs and the wit of her directives compel us to keep trying. Take the fictional story of the French artist’s grandfather––an overlooked Conceptual artist and close friend of Kurt Schwitters’s––that has proved to be a golden thread from which she has spun a number of engrossing films and installations, including the Turner Prize–winning Wantee, 2013. Yet though Prouvost has shown extensively in Europe, American audiences have had far fewer occasions to see her work. Details about the film installation and performance piece to debut at the Walker are scant, but that is part of the artist’s charm: She almost always leaves us guessing and restless for more.

Rachel Churner

“MOHAMED BOUROUISSA: URBAN RIDERS”

THE BARNES FOUNDATION
PHILADELPHIA
Through October 2
Curated by Sylvie Patry

In 2014, the Algerian-born, Paris-based artist Mohamed Bourouissa began a long-term project about black cowboys in northern Philadelphia, producing a slew of videos, photographs, drawings, and sculptures. He spent the better part of a year with the young men of the Fletcher Street Urban Riding Club, not only capturing a world that belies the mythology of the white western cowboy but also earning the trust of the riders—to the extent that he and they were able to create new works together, such as ritualized costume competitions and “horse-tuning” events, which borrow from the style and attitude of showing off tricked-out cars. Bourouissa’s first major solo show in the US promises to be both concise and expansive, focusing solely on the Fletcher Street project, displayed in its entirety—comprising more than fifty works, including new ones—for the first time in the city where it was made. The accompanying catalogue, which sets “Urban Riders” in the wider context of Bourouissa’s practice, is the first publication on the artist’s work in English.

Kaelen Wilson-Goldie

“SPEECH/ACTS”

ICA - INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART, PHILADELPHIA
PHILADELPHIA
Through December 23
Curated by Meg Onli

Joining a number of recent exhibitions seeking to define the discursive black radical tradition, “Speech/Acts” reflects on the legacy of the Black Arts Movement, which centered poetry, literature, and performance in its engagement with political discourses and everyday life following the civil rights movement. The exhibition situates an emerging generation of conceptualists alongside contemporary experimental poets and theorists such as Claudia Rankine and Fred Moten, demonstrating the elasticity of language as it circulates as text, image, or utterance—delivered in person, on a page, or on-screen. Accompanied by a reading room and a publication, the show features new works by Jibade-Khalil Huffman (his piece is inspired by Rankine’s critically acclaimed Citizen: An American Lyric [2014]) and Tiona McClodden (whose video and curatorial work often delves into queer and black creative genealogies), as well as recent videos, installations, and drawings by Steffani Jemison, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, Martine Syms, and Tony Lewis.

Jamillah James