U.S. Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

“MOHAMED BOUROUISSA: URBAN RIDERS”

THE BARNES FOUNDATION
PHILADELPHIA
June 30 - October 2
Curated by Sylvie Patry

In 2014, the Algerian-born, Paris-based artist Mohamed Bourouissa began a long-term project about black cowboys in northern Philadelphia, producing a slew of videos, photographs, drawings, and sculptures. He spent the better part of a year with the young men of the Fletcher Street Urban Riding Club, not only capturing a world that belies the mythology of the white western cowboy but also earning the trust of the riders—to the extent that he and they were able to create new works together, such as ritualized costume competitions and “horse-tuning” events, which borrow from the style and attitude of showing off tricked-out cars. Bourouissa’s first major solo show in the US promises to be both concise and expansive, focusing solely on the Fletcher Street project, displayed in its entirety—comprising more than fifty works, including new ones—for the first time in the city where it was made. The accompanying catalogue, which sets “Urban Riders” in the wider context of Bourouissa’s practice, is the first publication on the artist’s work in English.

Kaelen Wilson-Goldie

Daniel Arsham, Amethyst Sports Ball Cavern (detail), 2016, amethyst crystal, quartz, Hydro-Stone, dimensions variable.

“Daniel Arsham: Hourglass”

HIGH MUSEUM OF ART
ATLANTA
Through May 21
Curated by Michael Rooks and Jonathan Odden

This show guides the viewer through three distinct environments: a cavern of crushed-amethyst athletic balls, an hourglass-filled gallery, and a Japanese Zen garden patrolled by a performer in the guise of its resident hermit-monk. In lieu of rocks, this figure tends to a garden of sculptures cast from everyday objects, which Daniel Arsham offers up like riddles for some future archaeologist to decipher. For these works, the artist forgoes the monotone grays of his earlier casts in favor of blue calcite, a startlingly vivid material Arsham began using only recently, following the correction of his color-blindness. This jolt of color effects the estrangement typically lent by historical distance, fostering a reading of the objects as apocryphal artifacts that must be negotiated within the Zen garden’s purposefully ahistorical terrain. The exhibition thus enacts a temporal suspension not unlike that of its eponymous timepiece, perpetually overturned.

Kate Sutton

Yayoi Kusama, Flower Overcoat, 1964, wood hanger, plastic flowers and metallic paint on cloth overcoat, 50 3/4 × 28 7/8 × 5 3/4".

“Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors”

HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Through May 14
Curated by Mika Yoshitake

Bolstered by the artist’s 2012 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Kusama legend—and blue-chip brand—is poised for even greater recognition via this major chronological survey of more than sixty paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. Coinciding with a proliferation of new scholarship (and amplified by an extensive catalogue produced for the occasion), the show will include lesser-known works made after the artist’s return to Japan from New York in 1973. But as the exhibition title indicates, its main draw will surely be its six “mirror rooms,” the LED-lit chambers that exemplify the seeming limitlessness of Kusama’s mass appeal. Travels to the Seattle Art Museum, June 30–Sept. 10; the Broad, Los Angeles, Oct. 2017–Jan. 2018; Art Gallery of Ontario, Mar.–May 2018; Cleveland Museum of Art, July–Oct. 2018.

Joan Kee