International Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

Duane Hanson, Woman with a Laundry Basket, 1974, oil paint, cardboard, resin, talc, fiberglass, fabric, plastic, approx. 65 × 33 1/8 × 27 1/2". From “Hyper Real.”

“HYPER REAL”

NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA
CANBERRA
October 20 - February 18, 2018
Curated by Otto Letze and Jaklyn Babington

Since the late 1960s, sculptors around the world, including John De Andrea and Duane Hanson, have been creating eerily lifelike simulacra of human bodies, first through traditional techniques of modeling, casting, and the careful application of paint, and later by learning from the film industry’s special-effects fabricators in order to generate utterly fantastic, often digitally assisted visions of alternative realities. Featuring a provocatively diverse assortment of practices, this traveling exhibition tracks developments in hyperrealism over the past forty years, spotlighting artists ranging from Hanson and De Andrea to younger prodigies, including Ron Mueck and Sam Jinks, as well as seeming outliers such as Berlinde de Bruyckere. The show has been expanded significantly for its Australian debut—a fitting development, given the easily forgotten enthusiasm with which artists in that country took to hyperrealism. Travels to Kunsthal Rotterdam Mar.–July 2018.

Charles Green

Yee I-Lann, Fluid World, 2010, ink-jet print, acid dye, indigo dye, and batik crackle on silk twill, 51 × 111 3/4". From “Sunshower: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia, 1980s to Now.”

“SUNSHOWER: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM SOUTHEAST ASIA, 1980S TO NOW”

NATIONAL ART CENTER/MORI ART MUSEUM
TOKYO
Through October 23
Curated by Merv Espina, Mami Kataoka, Vera Mey, Jo-Lene Ong, Grace Samboh, and Naoki Yoneda

At a time when Western alliances such as NATO and the EU are under unprecedented threat, other international post–World War II consortia have taken on renewed significance.“Sunshower” marks the fifty-year anniversary of ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations), a ten-country trade partnership founded in 1967, with a major presentation of eighty-five artists from the member nations. Hoping to sidestep the often-reductive frameworks of large-scale, geography-based surveys, the fourteen-person curatorial team (of which the core group numbers six) has adopted a rubric of nine subthemes: cartography, conflict, identity, history, archiving, spirituality, indigenous culture, social practice, and the quotidian. Through such groupings, the show, which spans two Tokyo venues, promises a diverse picture of a region, room for digression, and, perhaps, an alternative approach to thinking about international relations. Travels to the Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Japan, Nov. 3–Dec. 25.

Jyoti Dhar

Paul Klee, Wald-Hexen (Forest Witches), 1938, oil on paper on burlap, 39 × 29 1/8".

“10 AMERICAN ARTISTS: AFTER PAUL KLEE” and “PAUL KLEE: THE ABSTRACT DIMENSION”

ZENTRUM PAUL KLEE BERN, SWITZERLAND
BERN, SWITZERLAND
Through January 7, 2018
Curated by Fabienne Eggelhöfer

FONDATION BEYELER BASEL, SWITZERLAND
BASEL, SWITZERLAND
October 1–January 21, 2018
Curated by Anna Szech

Two exhibitions in Switzerland will focus on favorite son and noncitizen Paul Klee. Eggelhöfer picks ten American painters (including Jackson Pollock and Norman Lewis) who borrowed from the endlessly inventive European when “almost everybody, whether conscious of it or not, was learning from Klee,” as Clement Greenberg wrote. Eggelhöfer’s exhibition will emphasize how Klee’s prizing of process served as a resource for others—often for making paintings that resembled his very little. Among other things, many of these artists wanted to learn how to deal with abstraction as a porous way of working, one not at all opposed to representation. The Beyeler’s show will stress this aspect of Klee’s sprawling oeuvre, from mock–De Stijl grids to invented hieroglyphs. “10 American Artists” travels to the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Feb. 3–May 6, 2018.

Annie Bourneuf

“100 JAAR DE STIJL: PLAYING WITH LETTERS”

VAN ABBEMUSEUM
EINDHOVEN, THE NETHERLANDS
Through November 10
Curated by Diana Franssen and Willem Smit

The most famous hundredth birthday this year may be that of the Russian Revolution, but let’s not forget the founding of De Stijl, which is being well marked in its Dutch birthplace. De Stijl means “The Style,” a dogmatic self-designation if ever there was one, yet the movement produced a striking range of work and was, of course,  beset by its share of schisms. (In fact, on August 20, Amsterdam’s Stedelijk closed a show focusing on Chris Beekman, who left the movement out of frustration with its lack of political engagement.) This exhibition, part of the Van Abbemuseum’s centenary celebration, focuses on De Stijl’s eponymous publication, which was published by Theo van Doesburg and featured typography, design, and declarations of the movement’s radical, often utopian aims.

Harry Cooper

Matthew Plummer-Fernandez, Material Want (detail), 2016. Rendering. From “Open Codes: Living in Digital Worlds.”

“OPEN CODES: LIVING IN DIGITAL WORLDS”

ZKM | CENTER FOR ART AND MEDIA
KARLSRUHE, GERMANY
October 20 - August 5, 2018
Curated by Peter Weibel

Organized by ZKM in collaboration with multiple German research institutes, this historical survey traces the developments in math and physics that led to the invention of digital code, ushering in the many technologies that shape our culture and society today. Spanning three hundred years, the show places scientific and technological documents and artifacts in conversation with artworks, suggesting an affinity—if not a direct connection—between the ways in which these objects frame the world. The stakes of this interdisciplinarity are high: Over the past several years, many have argued for new media art’s inclusion in mainstream contemporary art discourse (for example, by pointing to new media’s fundamental interactivity as proof of its kinship with relational aesthetics). Provocatively, “Open Codes” promises to swing the pendulum back, grounding its objects as much in the history of technology as in the history of art.

Tina Rivers Ryan

Jorge Pinheiro, Untitled, 1968, oil on wood, 76 5/8 × 58 5/8".

JORGE PINHEIRO

SERRALVES MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART
PORTO, PORTUGAL
Through January 7, 2018
Curated by Pedro Cabrita Reis

There is no doubt that Jorge Pinheiro occupies a singular place in the history of Portuguese art since 1950, but observers differ in their characterizations of the nature of his achievement and the greatest strengths of his work. He deploys both figuration and abstraction in his art, intermingling those two modes in complex ways to generate works that are strikingly diverse in appearance, yet united by a systematic austerity. More than eighty such paintings, drawings, and sculptures will be on view in this retrospective, which terms itself historical but also includes a new sculpture conceived for the museum, and is curated by artist and Pinheiro enthusiast Pedro Cabrita Reis, with installation design by architect Eduardo Souto de Moura.
Translated from Portuguese by Clifford E. Landers    

Alexandre Melo