U.S. Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

Roe Ethridge, Nancy with Polaroid, 2003–2006, C-print, 40 × 32 1/2"

“Roe Ethridge: Nearest Neighbor”

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER, CINCINNATI
CINCINNATI
Through March 12
Curated by Kevin Moore

Gathering more than sixty photographs (all but one made since 2000), a handful of sculptures, and a video making its debut, Roe Ethridge’s first US museum survey will provide a heady dose of the artist’s faux-generic, technically impeccable style—one of the post–Pictures generation’s most influential. Although his sleek, satiric take on advertorial-style fashion and still life is now pervasive, few imitators can match Ethridge’s witty mix of art and commerce, document and fiction. Even pictures that appear to be dumb documents help undermine antique notions of photographic truth: His perfect pumpkin is actually a shot of a sticker (Pumpkin Sticker, 2010), and in what is clearly a photograph of a Point Break movie poster, he has replaced Patrick Swayze’s head with a shaggy self-portrait (Untitled [Point Break], 2010). His tendency to produce what curator Kevin Moore calls a “synthetic version . . . of the reality we think we know” makes Ethridge a reliably destabilizing force; his seduction can turn into a sly slap in the face.

Vince Aletti

Yayoi Kusama, Flower Overcoat, 1964, wood hanger, plastic flowers and metallic paint on cloth overcoat, 50 3/4 × 28 7/8 × 5 3/4".

“Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors”

HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Through May 14
Curated by Mika Yoshitake

Bolstered by the artist’s 2012 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Kusama legend—and blue-chip brand—is poised for even greater recognition via this major chronological survey of more than sixty paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. Coinciding with a proliferation of new scholarship (and amplified by an extensive catalogue produced for the occasion), the show will include lesser-known works made after the artist’s return to Japan from New York in 1973. But as the exhibition title indicates, its main draw will surely be its six “mirror rooms,” the LED-lit chambers that exemplify the seeming limitlessness of Kusama’s mass appeal. Travels to the Seattle Art Museum, June 30–Sept. 10; the Broad, Los Angeles, Oct. 2017–Jan. 2018; Art Gallery of Ontario, Mar.–May 2018; Cleveland Museum of Art, July–Oct. 2018.

Joan Kee