News

The Armory Show

Hundreds of Galleries Converge in New York for Armory Week

Armory week returns with hundreds of galleries exhibiting at more than half a dozen art fairs across New York City, including ADAA, the Armory Show, Art on Paper, the Clio Art Fair, Independent New York, NADA, Scope, Spring/Break Art Show, and Volta New York. Highlights this year include the Armory Show’s new presentation style for contemporary and modern works, which will no longer be divided into two sections; NADA, which is being held during Armory week for the first time and is donating 50 percent of proceeds from its ticket sales to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU); and Spring/Break Art Show, which will transform two floors of its new location—a Times Square office building—continuing its tradition of activating underused historic spaces in New York City.

Here is your guide for this week’s fairs:

ADAA
March 1–5
Admission: $25
Organized by a nonprofit organization, the Art Dealers Association of America, ADAA will return to the Park Avenue Armory for the twenty-ninth edition of America’s longest running art fair. Seventy-two galleries are participating, including Fergus McCaffrey, who will present works by Viennese artist Birgit Jürgenssen; James Fuentes, who will exhibit works by Tamuna Sirbiladze and Noam Rappaport; Hosfelt Gallery, who will highlight four decades of work by Argentinian artist Liliana Porter; Casey Kaplan, who will present paintings by American artist Sarah Crowner; and David Zwirner, who will present new paintings on canvas and on paper by Chris Ofili, which have never been shown publicly before. Longtime ADAA members who are newly returning to the fair include Paula Cooper Gallery, presenting new works by post-Conceptual artist Kelley Walker; and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, presenting a sculptural installation by Rirkrit Tiravanija.

On Friday, March 3, Art in America editor in chief Lindsay Pollock will moderate the keynote event, “Beyond New York: Cultural Vibrancy Across the US,” a panel discussion between Lawrence J. Wheeler, director of the North Carolina Museum of Art; Kaywin Feldman, the Nivin and Duncan McMillan director of the Minneapolis Institute of Art; and Zannie Voss, director of the National Center for Arts Research at Southern Methodist University. The group will discuss their individual successes and strategies for engaging their local arts and cultural communities.

The Armory Show
March 2–5
Admission: $47
The twenty-third edition of the Armory Show is the first fair organized under the leadership of Benjamin Genocchio, who was named director before the opening of the 2016 edition. Genocchio promised to present “more thoughtful, tightly curated presentations” this year while expanding the fair’s talks, programs, and performances. This iteration of the fair will merge its modern and contemporary sections. Featuring 210 galleries at Piers 92 and 94, the fair welcomes seventy-one galleries for the first time, including Galleria Continua (San Gimignano, Beijing, Les Moulins, Havana), Jeffrey Deitch (New York), kaufmann repetto (Milan, New York), Kayne Griffin Corcoran (Los Angeles), Galerie Peter Kilchmann (Zurich), Galerie Krinzinger (Vienna), Lévy Gorvy (New York, London, Geneva), Fergus McCaffrey (New York), kamel mennour (Paris), Pace Gallery (New York, London, Beijing, Hong Kong, Paris, Palo Alto), PROYECTOSMONCLOVA (Mexico City), Stuart Shave/Modern Art (London), Sultana (Paris), Various Small Fires (Los Angeles), Waldburger Wouters (Brussels), Galerie Fons Welters (Amsterdam), and White Cube (London, Hong Kong).

Other highlights include, curator Jarrett Gregory’s selection of twelve artists from ten countries for the “Focus” section, titled “What is to Be Done,” which will revolve around the idea of political and social awareness during a time of uncertainty. New works by American-born Pakistani artist Amna Asghar, whose work reflects on the exchange of imagery between East and West; sculptures from the Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantations Congolaises (CATPC) that confront the trauma of colonialism; and a film by Johan Grimonprez exploring the global arms trade will be on view. A new section, “Platform,” will also make its debut. Curated by Eric Shiner, “Platform” will include large-scale artworks, installations, and site-specific commissions by artists Abel Barroso, Patricia Cronin, Douglas Coupland, Abigail DeVille, Sebastian Errazuriz, Dorian Gaudin, Jun Kaneko, Per Kirkeby, Yayoi Kusama, Iván Navarro, Evan Roth, Fiete Stolte, Lawrence Weiner, and Ai Weiwei.

Art on Paper
March 2–5
Admission: $25
Art on Paper’s third edition will feature eighty galleries presenting paper-based art that “explores, expands, and re-imagines what a work on paper can be.” It will take place at Pier 36. Exhibitors include: AroundSpace Gallery (Shanghai), Catherine Clark Gallery (San Francisco), Dolan/Maxwell (Philadelphia), Gibbons & Nicholas (Dublin), Imaginario Galeria de Arte (Buenos Aires), and Margaret Thatcher Projects (New York).

Clio Art Fair
March 2–5
No Admission
Clio Art Fair, billed as the anti-fair for independent artists, presents works by artists without gallery representation. “Without the constraints and usual concerns of the art business, these artists have been freed up to use different materials and media and to deviate from accepted art practice definitions. The resulting work being exhibited seeks to foster a dialogue that transcends prescribed geographies, hierarchies, and markets.” This year’s edition will feature Carla Accardi, Nina Berman, Maurizio Cattelan, and Piero Manzoni, among others.

Independent New York
March 2–5
Admission $25
The eighth edition of the fair will be held at Spring Studios in Tribeca. Fifty-two exhibitors from twenty cities will participate. The fair is organized into five sections: solo exhibitions by women artists, 1980s generation artists, major works from the 1970s, intergenerational groupings, and site-specific installations. Among the galleries exhibiting are Balice Hertling (Paris), Garth Greenan Gallery (New York), Freedman Fitzpatrick (Los Angeles), Lehmann Maupin (New York/Hong Kong), Maureen Paley (London), and Francesca Pia (Zurich).

NADA
March 2–5
Admission: $20
The sixth edition of the New Art Dealers Alliance’s annual NADA fair will be held for the first time in Skylight Clarkson North in SoHo. With one hundred exhibitors, the fair will consist of two sections: “Exhibitors” and “Projects.” This year NADA is collaborating with Kickstarter to bring a series of conversations, performances, and events to New York, including “Reinventing Museums,” a conversation with Alex Kalman of Mmuseumm, Ayodamola Okunseinde and Salome Asega of the Iyapo Repository, and Nico Wheadon of the Studio Museum in Harlem. Fifty percent of the proceeds from this year’s ticket sales will be donated to the ACLU. The other half of the revenue raised will assist international galleries working to gain more exposure in the United States.

Scope
March 2–5
Admission: $25
The seventh edition of Scope New York returns to a new Chelsea location at Metropolitan Pavilion. It will host sixty international galleries as well as a focused schedule of special events, performances, and talks. Scope’s “Breeder Program,” which introduces new galleries to the contemporary market, is also celebrating its sixteenth year. Former participants in the program include: Peres Projects, John Connelly Presents, Galeria Enrique Guerrero, Daniel Reich Gallery, Bischoff/ Weiss, Spinello Projects, INVISIBLE-EXPORTS, SEVENTEEN, ROKEBY, Taxter Spengemann, and Magical Artroom.

Spring/Break Art Show
March 1–6
Admission: $15
The Spring/Break Art Show will take over two floors of a Times Square office building this year, where curators will exhibit works in response to the theme of “Black Mirror”—a looking glasses meant for aesthetic reflection once used by old masters in landscape painting and portraiture. The sixth edition to coincide with Armory week, the fair also suggests to fairgoers a reading list, which includes Arnaud Maillet’s The Claude Glass: Use and Meaning of the Black Mirror in Western Art (2004) and The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891) by Oscar Wilde.

Volta New York
March 1–5
Admission: $20
Founded in 2005 by three art dealers as a fair “by galleries, for galleries,” Volta New York spotlights artists primarily through solo projects. Opening at Pier 90, the fair will present “Wintercheck Factory Lounge,” a site-specific ensemble of functional sculptural furniture that will serve as place of rest and space for contemplating the surrounding large-format exhibitor booths. “As a functioning design studio, we oscillate between commercial and personal work,” explains Kristen Wentrcek, founder of the Brooklyn-based Wintercheck Factory studio. “These two facets inform one another and have begun to merge more distinctly this year.” Volta will also feature a section curated by Wendy Vogel, titled “Your Body Is a Battleground,” featuring eight artists: Zachary Fabri (ROCKELMANN& and Aljira), Nona Faustine (Baxter St CCNY), Joiri Minaya (Casa Quien), Kent Monkman (Peters Projects), Deborah Roberts (Art Palace), Sable Elyse Smith (MOCADA), Melissa Vandenberg (Maus Contemporary / beta pictoris), and Carmen Winant (Fortnight Institute).

ALL IMAGES

LATEST NEWS