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Lévy Gorvy’s gallery on Madison Avenue.
Lévy Gorvy’s gallery on Madison Avenue.

New York Dealers Lévy Gorvy, Amalia Dayan, Salon 94, Announce Merger

Two New York galleries—Lévy Gorvy and Salon 94—and dealer Amalia Dayan have announced that they are joining forces to establish a single consortium, called LGDR, whose flagship will be situated on the city’s tony Upper East Side. The news, first reported in the New York Times, is said to have come as a shock to a number of the galleries’ artists, whose fate is unclear.

The new entity, which takes its name from the last initials of its owners—Dominique Lévy and Brett Gorvy, cofounders of Lévy Gorvy; veteran dealer Amalia Dayan; and Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, the owner of Salon 94—will occupy digs at 3 East Eighty-Ninth Street, a landmarked 1915 mansion that Greenberg Rohatyn bought in 2019 to consolidate the three branches of Salon 94 then in existence. LGDR, which will also open outposts in London, Hong Kong, and Paris, is expected to launch next year, and its owners have said the gallery will forego participation in all art fairs except those taking place in Asia.

The move comes about eighteen months after Acquavella Galleries, Gagosian, and Pace teamed up to sell a large collection, and roughly a year after New York dealer Gavin Brown closed up shop to partner with Barbara Gladstone. LGDR is widely seen as an attempt on the part of the four participating gallerists, all longtime friends and each independently wealthy, to compete with global monoliths such as Gagosian, Hauser & Wirth, Pace, and David Zwirner.

“For the biggest galleries, it’s a kind of arms race, growing their square footage and adding new locations,” explained Natasha Degen, chair of art market studies at New York’s Fashion Institute of Technology. “Ultimately these moves are not about profit but burnishing the galleries’ brands.” Degen described LGDR’s decision to consolidate their real estate and spurn Western art fairs, thus trimming related costs, as “especially smart,” making the gallery “streamlined, synergistic, and nimble.”

Among the artists represented by the consolidating parties are Pat Stier, Pierre Soulages, and Günther Uecker, all at Lévy Gorvy, and Derrick Adams, Judy Chicago, Marilyn Minter, and Laurie Simmons at Salon 94. Speaking with Artnet News on the merger, Adrian Piper, who has a nonexclusive relationship with Lévy Gorvy, was sanguine. “I don’t see that individual galleries have much choice other than to pool their resources,” she said. “It’s a rational response to current circumstances.”

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