News

  • Whitney Employees Charged with Stealing $880,000

    Two workers at the Whitney Museum of American Art who were videotaped pocketing cash from ticket sales have been charged with stealing $880,000, Newsday reports. Nafeem Wahlah, the museum's manager of visitor services, stole $850,000 by voiding ticket sales and keeping the money, said Manhattan district attorney Robert Morgenthau. Rowan Foley, who worked for Wahlah, stole $30,000 the same way, Morgenthau said.

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  • Young German Artists Capture Collectors' Attention

    Fresh blood has given the international popularity of German art a boost, as collectors in New York and London snatch up works by young German artists, Sabina Casagrande writes in Deutsche Welle. A new generation has emerged in the footsteps of slightly older artists like Neo Rauch: Martin Eder, Tim Eitel, Jonathan Meese, and Daniel Richter are a few of the thirtysomethings who have become extremely popular on the international market, earning the moniker Young German Artists, or “YGAs.”

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  • Arab Artists Struggle to Break Free of Stereotypes

    In recent years, contemporary art from the Arab world has started to carve out a distinct niche for itself on the global scene, Samar Farah writes in the Christian Science Monitor. But with this spike in recognition, a young generation is now struggling to assert a singular identity that doesn't conform to Western stereotypes. As the channels of globalization open commercial opportunities abroad, it's increasingly difficult for Arab artists not to conform to the expectations of those flocking to the gallery shows, biennales, websites, and organizations dedicated to art from the region.

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  • Kurtz Not Interested in Plea Agreement, Says Attorney

    The majority of cases in US District Court end with plea agreements, Carolyn Thompson writes in Newsday. But Steve Kurtz, the artist charged last month with improperly obtaining the biological materials he uses in his work, is not interested in such an outcome. “There's no discussion of that. There's been no hint of that,” Kurtz's attorney, Paul Cambria, said following a procedural hearing in US District Court in Buffalo. “We're not interested.”

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  • Getty Appoints New Curator of Sculpture and Decorative Arts

    Antonia Boström has been appointed curator of sculpture and decorative arts at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Art Museum Network News reports. She will assume her new post in the fall 2004, overseeing the newly combined departments of sculpture and decorative arts, with responsibility for creating an integrated, cohesive approach to building and exhibiting the Getty’s holdings of sculpture, furniture, and decorative arts. Boström has been at the Detroit Institute of Arts since 1996, most recently as associate curator of European sculpture and decorative arts in the Department of European art.

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  • General Idea Show Prompts Police Investigation

    An award-winning traveling exhibition of the work of the collective General Idea prompted a police investigation in Canada during its stop at a gallery in Regina, Saskatchewan, Tim Cook reports in the Toronto Star. A collection of photos showing aroused nude men resulted in a complaint to authorities. “[The work has] been shown all over the world for twelve years and this is the first complaint we have ever received,” said AA Bronson, who founded General Idea along with the late Jorge Zontal and Felix Partz.

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  • ICA's Former Director Promotes a New Cultural Revolution

    Philip Dodd has a reason for promoting Chinese arts, Louise Jury writes in The Independent: He has handed in his notice at London's ICA to launch a consultancy that will forge cultural projects between China and the UK. Compared with countries such as America and France, Britain has been slow to pick up on the new cultural revolution that is exporting a vibrant generation of artists and designers to the West, but there are signs that the country may be catching up, and Dodd wants to speed up the process.

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  • Guggenheim Taiwan Languishes for Lack of Funds

    Jason Hu, mayor of the Taiwanese city of Taichung, urged the country's central government yesterday to provide the funds for the plan to build a satellite Guggenheim Museum in the city before it's too late, Taiwan's Central News Agency reports. Noting that funding for the museum, designed by Zaha Hadid, was not included in a recent $15 billion national construction subsidy, Hu said that the project has been stalled since last year and might have to be scrapped.

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  • Van Gogh Thieves Sentenced in Amsterdam

    Two men were convicted in Amsterdam on Monday of stealing a pair of paintings valued at more than $2 million from the city's Van Gogh Museum. They were sentenced to at least four years in prison each, Newsday reports. Vincent Van Gogh's Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen and View of the Sea at Scheveningen were stolen in December 2002 and have been recovered. The paintings have a combined value of $2.2 million, according to a museum estimate.

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  • The Architectural Conundrum Across the Hudson

    The Goldman Sachs building on Jersey City's waterfront, designed by Cesar Pelli, is the anchor of a new city, a kind of Shanghai on the Hudson, that has sprung up over the past decade on what was once industrial land, Paul Goldberger writes in the New Yorker. This enclave of new buildings is an enormous complex—by far the largest cluster of skyscrapers in the region outside Manhattan. As Jersey City grows, you can sense a yearning to make a real city, but what makes it attractive to tenants—the fact that it is shiny and new and free of the messiness of New York or, for that matter, Newark—is

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  • Beaverbook Dispute to Be Settled through Arbitration

    The continuing dispute over paintings in Canada's Beaverbrook Art Gallery will be settled through a binding arbitration chaired by former Canadian Supreme Court justice Peter Corey, CBC News reports. The ownership dispute concerns more than one hundred paintings, including works by J.M.W. Turner and Lucian Freud, in the New Brunswick gallery's collection. According to the London-based Beaverbrook Foundation, the disputed art was on loan to the gallery, while the gallery asserts that the artworks were permanent gifts from Lord Beaverbrook, who founded the small but prestigious venue in 1958.

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  • British Museums' Artifacts Seized in Australia

    Aboriginal artifacts, including two early bark etchings, have been seized while on loan from two British museums to the Museum Victoria in Melbourne, the BBC reports. Members of the Dja Dja Wurrung tribe secured an emergency order preventing the items being returned to the British Museum and the Royal Botanic Gardens. “The emergency declaration puts at risk the very legal framework that allows such exhibitions to take place,” the Royal Botanic Gardens and the British Museum said in a joint statement.

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