News

  • Judge Orders Mediation of Ground Zero Dispute

    The architect and leaseholder of the Freedom Tower planned for the World Trade Center site were ordered by a judge on Wednesday to try to settle a fee dispute out of court to avoid a trial, Christine Kearney reports on Reuters. Architect Daniel Libeskind has filed a lawsuit claiming leaseholder Larry Silverstein owes him more than $840,000 in design fees for the Freedom Tower. State Supreme Court Justice Karla Moskowitz ordered them to submit to mediation while the parties also proceed toward a possible court trial.

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  • Chapmans Plan a New, Pointedly Topical Hell

    Among the works that burned in the fire that tore through a London art-storage warehouse last May was Jake and Dinos Chapman's Hell, which depicted the apocalypse with thousands of tiny plastic and tin figures, individually cast and handpainted and configured in the shape of a giant swastika. As Carol Vogel writes in the New York Times, art critics had called it the Chapmans' most important work. Vestiges of Hell were salvaged after the fire, and now the artists plan to make a new version, one that will incorporate the many world events since the original's completion in 2000: 9/11, the war in

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  • Lubin's Shooting Kennedy Takes Eldredge Prize

    David Lubin, the Charlotte C. Weber Professor of Art at Wake Forest University in Winston Salem, North Carolina, has won the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Eldredge Prize for his book about the effect on Americans of photos of President John F. Kennedy in the decade leading up to his assassination in 1963. As the Charlotte Observer reports, the jurors wrote that the book, Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images, shows “how powerfully [images of Kennedy] have shaped perception and memory in our time.” It was the sixteenth annual award of the two-thousand-dollar Charles C. Eldredge

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  • Immendorff Admits to Charges

    The Independent's Tony Paterson reports that Jörg Immendorff admitted in court in Düsseldorf Tuesday that he had been with nine prostitutes from the city's red-light district in a hotel suite last year and that he had cocaine. “I admit to everything of which I am accused,” Immendorff's lawyer said in a statement read to the court at the opening of his trial. “But I was playing out my erotic fantasies and it never came to sex.” The artist is charged with having drugs and encouraging the women to partake and, if convicted, may be stripped of his professorship at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and

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  • Ground Zero Litigation Heats Up

    Architect Daniel Libeskind held out “approval” on the World Trade Center site's Freedom Tower design in an attempted $800,000 shakedown, site developer Larry Silverstein charged in court papers yesterday. The Daily News's Maggie Haberman reports that the salvo was Silverstein's response to a lawsuit filed in Manhattan Supreme Court last week by Libeskind, who claims the developer cheated him out of money he was owed for work on the planned tower.

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  • V&A Fails to Get Lottery Money for Libeskind Project

    The Victoria and Albert Museum has failed in its bid to get a lottery grant to build its controversial “Spiral” extension, costing £70 million ($129 million), the BBC reports. A museum spokeswoman said the decision by the Heritage Lottery Fund put the whole project in doubt. The London museum had applied for a grant of £15 million ($28 million) to build the Daniel Libeskind-designed “crumpled” construction in the museum's outside courtyard.

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  • Liverpool Searches for a Replacement for Alsop's “Cloud”

    Despite scrapping its plan for an ambitious globe-shaped building by innovative architect Will Alsop, Liverpool may still boast “jaw-dropping” buildings for its year as European Capital of Culture in 2008, the city council's chief executive, David Henshaw, said on Tuesday. The Liverpool Echo reports that a new museum, a theater complex, a world heritage center, and leisure facilities are all options for the site left vacant by yesterday's decision to scrap the “Cloud,” as Alsop's design was known. But there will be no direct replacement for the controversial Cloud, and any new scheme is likely

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  • Sotheby's Management and Art Handlers at an Impasse

    Sotheby's informed Teamsters Local 814 last week that fifty-four property handlers—who move art, furniture, and objects around the premises—wouldn't be allowed to return to work until a labor pact was reached, Elizabeth Sanger writes in Newsday. The two sides have been negotiating over a new contract for seven weeks, the company said, but as of Monday night no further sessions were scheduled, and the workers had set up picket lines. “As a service business we can't risk an unplanned interruption of vital client services,” Sotheby's spokeswoman Diana Phillips said Monday, explaining why

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  • A Robust Photo San Francisco

    While the San Francisco International Art Exposition has passed the top of its trajectory, its more specialized counterpart, Photo San Francisco, may still be gaining, Kenneth Baker writes in the San Francisco Chronicle. Photo San Francisco 2004—the fifth of its kind—opens on Thursday and continues through Sunday. More than eighty galleries will participate.

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  • An Investor-Friendly Pension Plan for Artists

    The commodity-trading mentality of the art investment world has produced a scheme intended to assure artists some long-term financial stability while making money for investors, Julie Salamon writes in the New York Times. The Artist Pension Trust invites up-and-coming artists to contribute twenty pieces of their work to a tax-protected fund over a twenty-year period on the theory that some of the art will appreciate significantly. All the artists will share the profits, even if their initial promise never translates into increased value.

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  • Director of London's ICA to Step Down

    Philip Dodd, the director of London's Institute of Contemporary Arts, announced his resignation yesterday and said that Britain had become culturally “insular,” Nigel Reynolds reports in The Telegraph. Dodd, who is credited with having saved the institution from financial collapse after he took the helm seven years ago, said that after leaving the ICA in October he would focus on organizing cultural projects between Britain and China.

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  • Bush's Education Plan Leaves Art Behind

    Arts educators cheered when the arts were declared a “core” academic subject under the “No Child Left Behind” education-reform measure signed into law two years ago by President Bush, writes Karen MacPherson in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Since then, the cheers have turned to consternation as school districts around the nation have cut classroom time and funding for art and music. School officials say they need to focus attention and money on reading and math because students are tested annually on these subjects under the NCLB law.

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