News

  • Looking Ahead at the Whitney

    Adam D. Weinberg, the Whitney Museum of American Art's former curator of collections and recently director of Andover's Addison Gallery, returned as the Whitney's director on October 1. He replaced Maxwell Anderson, who resigned in May. In the Village Voice, Jerry Saltz assesses the the Whitney's current situation and offers some prescriptions for its future, advocating the addition of artists to its board of trustees and a stronger focus on shows by living artists.

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  • Ned Rifkin to Succeed Thomas Lentz at Smithsonian

    Ned Rifkin, director of the Smithsonian Institution's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, has been named director of its five international art museums, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. Rifkin succeeds Thomas Lentz, who will go to Cambridge, Massachusetts, to direct Harvard University's art museums.

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  • Fingerprint on Mystery Painting Said to Be Pollock's

    A fingerprint expert with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has weighed in to the uproar over a painting purchased in a California junk shop in 1992 and since alleged to have been painted by Jackson Pollock. The Ottowa Citizen's Randy Boswell reports that the expert, who was hired by a Montreal forensic art researcher, has asserted that prints on the painting were made by Pollock. If his findings are accepted as proof of provenance, retired Los Angeles–area truck driver Teri Horton's five-dollar investment could be worth more than ten million.

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  • In UK, J.M.W. Turner is Everywhere

    Four exhibitions dedicated to J.M.W. Turner are to open across Britain as galleries clamor to display works by the nineteenth-century painter. Some of the paintings have not been seen in the UK for more than a century, Louise Jury reports in The Independent. Ian Warrall, curator of “Turner and Venice,” which opens tomorrow at Tate Britain, noted that the UK had been unable to properly mark the 150th anniversary of the painter's death, in 2001, because major works were on long-term loan to Germany and Switzerland. Now that the paintings are back in the country, Britain has the opportunity to take

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  • Thomas W. Lentz to Direct Harvard Art Museums

    Thomas W. Lentz, named last week as the new director of the Harvard University Art Museums, said that he will pick up where his predecessor, James Cuno, left off. As the Boston Globe's Geoff Edgers reports, Lentz, speaking from the Smithsonian, where he is currently director of international museums, said he knows the university's museums need to be modernized and expanded. He also realizes he'll need to raise money to continue Cuno's work to strengthen the curatorial staff.

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  • Lee Bontecou on the Benefits of a Low Profile

    “Lee Bontecou: A Retrospective” opened at the UCLA Hammer Museum in Los Angeles on October 5. It was one of the most highly anticipated shows of the year and has drawn Bontecou, who withdrew from public view thirty years ago, back into the limelight. In an interview with CNN, the artist spoke about her life, her work, and the rationale behind staying out of the public eye for so long: “It was a conscious decision to not give shows and not have to have that pressure of having shows and all that stuff. I just wanted time to experiment.”

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  • British Museum Forcefully Rejects Pleas for Elgins' Return

    The British Museum yesterday issued its most stinging rejection yet of Greek pleas for the return of the Parthenon marbles. The Guardian's Fiachra Gibbons, Maev Kennedy, and David Hencke report that museum director Neil MacGregor gave a speech at a Museums Association conference in which he said that it was the museum's duty to preserve the universality of the marbles and to protect them from being appropriated as a nationalistic political symbol. Campaigners for the marbles' return said that they found the British Museum's attitude “insulting.”

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  • Sarah Sze Receives MacArthur Award

    Sculptor Sarah Sze has received a 2003 MacArthur Foundation fellowship, Felicia R. Lee reports in the New York Times. MacArthur fellows are artists, writers, scientists, and advocates who are chosen on the basis of the originality and creativity of their work. Each receives a $500,000 award. Twenty-four fellowships were awarded this year.

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  • New Picasso Museum Set to Open in Spain

    A new Picasso museum displaying more two hundred works by the artist, donated by his family, opens in Malaga, the capital of Andalusia, on October 27, Roberta Bosco writes in the Art Newspaper. Eight years in the making, the museum fulfills Picasso’s stated ambition to have a museum devoted to his work in his native city.

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  • Prison Official Admits Guilt in Dalí Theft

    A former assistant deputy warden at Rikers Island has admitted that he was one of the thieves who stole a 250,000-dollar Salvador Dalí sketch from the prison on March 1, Larry McShane reports in the Newark Star-Ledger. Mitchell Hochhauser, 40, also implicated three coworkers, who are due in court this month. Hochhauser claimed that the irreplaceable Dalí ink-and-pencil sketch was destroyed by a skittish codefendant, although his claim is up for debate.

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  • Sotheby's to Auction Vera G. List Collection

    Manhattan philanthropist Vera G. List, who died a year ago, amassed a collection that included works by Agnes Martin, Martin Puryear, Lee Bontecou, and Ed Ruscha. The New York Times's Carol Vogel reports that most of the art that remains in her collection is to be sold at Sotheby's in New York in a series of auctions on November 12 and 13 and February 12. Her modern British paintings are to be auctioned in London in December. Sotheby's estimates that the entire collection of nearly two hundred works will fetch 8.1 million to 10.7 million dollars.

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  • Drastic Cuts in Arts Funding for Second Year in a Row

    State legislatures throughout the US are finalizing their budgets for fiscal year 2004 and for the second year running, making drastic reductions in arts spending, Jason Edward Kaufman reports in the Art Newspaper.

    At least thirty-six of the fifty-seven states and US territories are slashing funding allocations for culture, and some states, such as California, have almost completely eliminated their subsidies to the arts.

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