News

  • Dresden's Splendors Head for an Unlikely Destination

    Jack Kyle has almost single-handedly put the city of Jackson, Mississippi, on the cultural map, Terence Rodrigues writes in the Art Newspaper. Neither an art historian nor a museum curator, he has nevertheless coaxed the directors of some of Europe's major museums and state collections into sending outstanding works of art to the city. Kyle's exhibitions over the last eight years include the largest show of Russian art ever presented outside Russia; “Splendours of Versailles” (1998); and, opening this month, an exhibition of four hundred works of art on loan from eight museums in Dresden, the

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  • Sante Fe Art Thefts Continue

    A string of art thefts that began with the December disappearance of a Georgia O'Keeffe painting is continuing in Sante Fe, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. Sometime between March 12 and 14, a pinewood carving valued at approximately $3,000 was stolen from the Museum of International Folk Art, and a painting by Stuart Davis was stolen Tuesday afternoon from a local gallery. It was valued at $125,000.

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  • Xu Bing Wins Inaugural Artes Mundi Prize

    Xu Bing was awarded the inaugural seventy-two-thousand-dollar Artes Mundi, the Wales International Visual Art Prize, at a ceremony at the National Museum and Gallery in Cardiff on Sunday, the Chicago Tribune reports. The New York–based Xu won the award competition with a work that uses dust collected near Ground Zero to trace an ancient Chinese verse on the floor of the National Museum and Gallery. It reads, “As there is nothing from the first, where does the dust collect itself.”

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  • On Kawara's Past and Future in the Public Eye

    The work of On Kawara is coming to Trafalgar Square this week, in a series of daylong readings from his works The Past (a book listing every year from 998,031 BC to AD 1969) and The Future (a book listing every year from AD 1980 to 1,001,980). As The Guardian's Maeve Kennedy reports, the readings will be performed by a man and a woman who will sit side by side in a glass box, speaking alternating lines from the works.

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  • Affordable Art Fair Taps into a Trend

    Buying art was once mainly the preserve of those rich enough to spend large sums of money at auction or confident enough to venture into smart galleries, Will Bennett writes in The Telegraph. But now fairs aimed at beginners, information on the Internet, and accessible exhibitions at galleries like Tate Modern are encouraging thousands of people to buy art. The Affordable Art Fair, founded in 1999 and with branches in London and New York, has tapped into and encouraged this new mood.

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  • International Asian Art Fair Opens in NYC

    The International Asian Art Fair, which opens today, has experienced changes since its debut in 1996, Holland Cotter writes in the New York Times. Some exhibitors have retired from the scene; others now do nonfair shows of their own. This year's edition feels right for its time: At a moment when the world at large is split into hostile armed camps, the international fair is a fusion event where many cultures meet.

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  • Now Broadcasting: WPS1

    On April 19, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center is starting an online radio station, WPS1, at its Web site, www.ps1.org, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. It is based in recently constructed studios in the Clocktower Building, a city-owned property designed by Stanford White at Leonard Street and Broadway in Lower Manhattan, where P.S. 1 has an exhibition space. Bloomberg L.P. has sponsored the project. Two years in the making and billed as the world's first art radio station, WPS1 will present original talk and music shows with contemporary writers, artists and musicians as hosts. The

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  • “Devastating” Cuts Proposed for Philadelphia Museum of Art

    Philadelphia's cash-strapped administration has proposed eliminating its annual $2.25 million appropriation for the Philadelphia Museum of Art—just as it is ramping up efforts to promote the city's museum district as a major destination. As Michael Hinkelman reports in the Philadelphia Daily News, the museum's director, Anne d'Harnoncourt, called the proposed loss of city funding “devastating.”

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  • Britons Invest Billions in Art

    Millions of Britons are investing in art instead of sticking with stocks and shares, Angus Howarth reports in The Scotsman. According to a recent poll, 24 percent of UK adults (some seven million) were putting money into alternative investments such as art and antiques. In the past year, the public has spent £3.5 billion ($6.3 billion) on works of art.

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  • Shock Value Conspicuously Absent at Beck's Futures Show

    The fifth Beck's Futures prize exhibition, now an established annual postcard from contemporary art's wildest shores, has opened at London's ICA, and according to Philip Dodd, the ICA's director, this year's exhibition proves “the days of shock are over.” While some of the work may not be ingratiating, Tim Dowling writes in The Guardian, there is a calm, nonconfrontational feel to the show. It represents a definite move away from dead sharks and unmade beds.

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  • A Shortage of Top-Notch Works Hinders Sales

    The art market is booming, but auction houses are fretting because there are not enough top works available, Paul Tharp reports in the New York Post. Although paintings and other treasures are fetching record prices at almost every auction, Sotheby's and Christie's both say their sales totals are down, and Christie's has turned away buyers for lack of masterworks to put on the block.

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  • Frank Gehry Challenges Critics of Toronto Project

    In an interview with the Globe and Mail's James Adams, Frank Gehry sounded off against critics who predict his planned $195 million renovation and expansion of Toronto's Art Gallery of Ontario is going to cost a lot more and wreck the building in the process. Attacks against Gehry have in recent weeks crystallized around accusations from AGO benefactor Joey Tanenbaum that the revamped gallery will have cost as much as $60 million more than what's being advertised by the time it's finished in early 2008. In response, Gehry asserts that the vast majority of his projects have come in either “dead-on

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