News

  • Funding Falls $46 Million Short for British Museums

    Curators of regional museums as well as London's British Museum protested today after the government's promised bailout fell thirty million pounds (forty-six million dollars) short of what they say is needed to prevent eventual meltdown, writes Fiachra Gibbons in The Guardian.

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  • Niemeyer Home Sparks Preservation Dispute

    As a battle rages over the preservation of the only private residence in the US designed by Oscar Niemeyer, Los Angeles wakes up to its cultural heritage, writes Nicolai Ouroussoff in the Los Angeles Times.

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  • Iraqi Sculptor Breaks the Mold

    Iraq's greatest sculptor, Mohammad Ghani, now makes work in reaction to the UN sanctions imposed on his country twelve years ago, reports Rory McCarthy in The Guardian. Despite Ghani's international reputation, this body of work has not been shown in public in Iraq.

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  • Australia Looks into Trust Funds for Artists

    The Australia Council for the Arts has announced an investigation into establishing trust accounts for artists, writes Lenny Ann Low in the Sydney Morning Herald. When work is sold the artist's portion of the sale will be lodged in a trust fund and not used by the gallery for any other purpose.

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  • Some, But Not Enough for the British Museum

    After being granted a one-time sum of fifty-seven million dollars by the British government, officials at the cash-strapped British Museum have warned that even this will not be enough for the institution's long-term plans, reports the BBC News.

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  • The Prado Expands, Quietly

    Architect José Rafael Moneo plans a discreet forty-five-million-dollar expansion for the Museo del Prado, writes Alan Riding in the New York Times.

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  • Manuel Alvarez Bravo Dies at One Hundred

    Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Mexico's greatest photographer and a world master of his art, died on Saturday at the age of one hundred at his home in Mexico City, writes Jonathan Kandell in the New York Times.

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  • Fort Worth's New Museum Takes Shape

    The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth's new building, designed by Tadao Ando, will make it the second-largest arena for postwar art in the country, writes Janet Kutner in the Dallas Morning News.

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  • Malcolm Forbes's Collection Goes Under the Hammer

    The collection of multimillionaire Malcolm Forbes—which includes works by Edward Burne-Jones, William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti—is expected to bring in at least $35 million at auction next spring, writes Maev Kennedy in The Guardian.

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  • Japan's New Paintings Are Back on the Market

    After Japan’s economic bubble burst in 1990, the majority of the paintings bought during the previous decade found their way back onto the market, writes Georgina Adam in the Art Newspaper.

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  • Three Museums Collaborate on Acquisition

    The Whitney Museum of American Art, Tate Modern, and the Centre Georges Pompidou have pooled their resources to copurchase Bill Viola's Five Angels for the Millennium, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times.

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  • Figures Show Art Market Weakening

    Figures compiled by the Art Sales Index (ASI) show that sales of fine art at auction fell for the period from August 1, 2001, to July 31, 2002, by almost 15 percent, with both the number of artworks sold and average prices weakening, writes Georgina Adams in the Art Newspaper.

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