News

  • Rubens May Stay in Russia After All

    A Russian businessman said Monday that he is the legal owner of a Rubens painting that was stolen from Germany in the chaos following World War II, and he has no plans to return it, Alex Kwiatkowski writes in the Miami Herald. It was widely reported over the weekend that the painting, Tarquinius and Lucretia, 1610–11, which had been missing for decades and is now in the hands of Russian authorities, would be returned to Germany.

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  • “Manet/Velázquez” Brings Enormous Sum to NY

    In Crain's New York Business, Miriam Kreinin Souccar reports that visitors to the Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition “Manet/Velázquez: The French Taste for Spanish Painting” spent 368 million dollars in New York City, according to a new survey by the museum. Nearly half of those who visited the show said that the exhibition, which ended in June, was the deciding factor for their trip.

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  • Art Fair's Opening Will Mark a Milestone for London

    Next month, writes The Telegraph's Colin Gleadell, a swarm of contemporary art dealers, collectors, museum curators, and journalists from all over the world will descend on London for the opening of the first Frieze Art Fair on October 16. London has never hosted a truly international contemporary art fair before, because there were not, it was argued, enough collectors in the UK to make the journey worthwhile. However, the fair's directors believe that things have changed sufficiently to make such a venture profitable.

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  • Edinburgh May Host A New International Art Festival

    The Scotsman's Iain Gale reports that members of Scotland's art community have formed a steering group that aims to bring a major international art festival to Edinburgh to complement the city's well-known performance art events. The group has gained momentum with the addition of two new members: Richard Demarco, an exhibition organizer who has been a ubiquitous presence on the Scottish art scene for more than thirty years; and the director of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Richard Calvocoressi.

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  • Eli Broad's Proposed Art School Draws Criticism

    Collector and philanthropist Eli Broad has successfully lobbied Los Angeles school officials to redesign a planned public high school, located on the city's Grand Avenue, as an elaborate visual and performing arts school. The new proposal—including a soaring tower, a conical library, two theaters, and exhibition space—would cost taxpayers at least eighteen million extra dollars and delay construction by a year, Duke Helfand and Doug Smith report in the Los Angeles Times. Now, as architects draw up their final plans, some school district officials and watchdog groups question whether Broad has

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  • Rubens Painting Will Return to Germany

    One of Peter Paul Rubens's masterpieces that was stolen from Germany following World War II is in the hands of authorities in Moscow, The Guardian reports. Christina Weiss, Germany's culture minister, said on Saturday that a dealer who had earlier tried to sell the painting, Tarquinius and Lucretia, 1610–11, to a German museum had handed it to Russian authorities, who plan to return it to Germany.

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  • Museum Closure Shocks Northwest's Art Community

    In 2001, Washington's Bellevue Art Museum relocated to a bold glass, aluminum, and concrete building designed by Steven Holl and announced its intent to position itself “at the center of the region’s cultural scene.” News that the museum will close this Tuesday has left people in Northwest art circles sad, shocked, and ready to criticize, Regina Hackett writes in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Many blame the museum's closure on the building itself. As Bruce Guenther, senior curator of contemporary art at the Portland Art Museum and former chief curator at the Seattle Art Museum, puts it: “It's

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  • LACMA Receives Trove of Dutch Masterworks

    Museum trustee Hannah Carter has donated eleven Dutch landscape and still-life paintings to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which hailed the gift as the most valuable it has ever received. The San Jose Mercury-News reports that the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century artworks, by a group of Rembrandt's contemporaries including Ambrosius Bosschaert and Emanuel de Witte, would be worth more than twenty-five million dollars at auction.

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  • President Signs Bill Ensuring Funding for Museums

    President Bush signed a bill on Thursday to keep federal dollars flowing to the nation's libraries and museums, The Guardian reports. The bill makes several changes to current law to streamline and strengthen museum and library services across the nation.

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  • Edward Said Dies at Sixty-Seven

    Edward Said, the critic, polical advocate, and seminal figure in the field of cultural studies, has died. He was sixty-seven and died at a New York hospital, Newsday reports. He had suffered from leukemia at least since the early 1990s.

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  • Director of Cincinnati's CAC To Step Down

    The Cincinnati Enquirer's Marilyn Bauer reports that, less than four months after opening the Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art, Charles Desmarais is stepping down as director and chief executive officer. A search for a successor will begin soon. After a six-month paid sabbatical, Desmarais will become the museum's curator at large.

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  • Boston MFA Revises Expansion Design

    The Boston Museum of Fine Arts revealed the designs for a new three-story wing to display American and contemporary art in February 2002. Since then, Geoff Edgers reports in the Boston Globe, the museum has quietly been working to raise money—officials won't say how much of the 425-million-dollar campaign goal has been pledged—and dealing with the bureaucratic realities of the expansion. As a result of concerns raised by a recent environmental impact report, architect Norman Foster's original design will be revised considerably.

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