News

  • Saatchi Derides Turner Prize

    Charles Saatchi, the most influential collector of modern art in Britain, has denounced the Turner Prize as “pseudo-controversial rehashed claptrap,” writes Catherine Milner in The Telegraph.

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  • L.A.'s Galleries Come into Their Own

    Despite its endemic sprawl and persistent inferiority complex, Los Angeles is the nation's second city for the visual arts, with commercial galleries making up a vital part of the scene, writes Suzanne Muchnic in the Los Angeles Times. With nearly one hundred that present public exhibition programs and keep their doors open during regular hours, Los Angeles is second only to Manhattan and well ahead of Chicago, its closest competitor.

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  • Artists Protest Plans for Artists' Housing

    A group of Boston artists says the flagship of the Boston Redevelopment Authority's plan to increase studio spaces in the city might displace the very people it aims to serve, writes Mary Jo Palumbo in the Boston Herald. The situation highlights a citywide concern that highly touted new projects for artist housing and studios in Boston are far more expensive than most artists can afford.

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  • San Francisco Institutions Consider Merger

    The Bay Area's preeminent schools of fine arts—the California College of Arts and Crafts and the San Francisco Art Institute—are considering merging into a single institution that would be one of the biggest independent art colleges in the country, writes Jesse Hamlin in the San Francisco Chronicle.

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  • Roberto Matta, Surrealist, Dies in His Nineties

    Roberto Sebastian Antonio Matta Echaurren, known as Matta, a premier Surrealist and major artist of the mid–twentieth century, died on Saturday in Tarquinia, Italy, writes Michael Kimmelman in the New York Times. He was ninety or ninety-one.

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  • New Group Flexibly Funds Restoration Projects

    An unusual Los Angeles–based arts philanthropy group is aiding endangered historic properties around the globe, writes Suzanne Muchnic in the Los Angeles Times. “This group does things differently,” says computer tycoon Peter Norton, who joined the twenty-member group precisely because it operates informally and takes on projects that tend, in his words, to fall between the cracks.

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  • A New Kind of Collecting?

    According to Christie's director Brett Gorvy, the “old masters” of contemporary art have become fashionable for a growing band of mid-generation collectors who are not affected by downturns in the stockmarket, writes Colin Gleadell in The Telegraph.

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  • Heiress Donates Enormous Sums to Poetry and Arts Advocacy

    Ruth Lilly, heiress to the Eli Lilly pharmaceutical fortune, has donated one hundred million dollars or more to Poetry magazine, leaving the world of philanthropy and the world of poetry agog at the size of the gift, write Fred Kaplan and Kathleen Schuckel in the Boston Globe. Lilly also donated at least eighty million dollars to Americans for the Arts, an advocacy and educational group based in Washington. Its president and CEO, Robert Lynch, said that his group's annual budget is currently eight million dollars and that its endowment is less than one million dollars.

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  • Uffizi's Unpaid Bills May Force It to Close

    The Uffizi Gallery of Florence could be plunged into darkness because the authorities have not paid the electricity bill, writes Bruce Johnston in The Telegraph. The financial plight of the arts board at the center of the crisis—which also oversees scores of other masterpieces, including Michelangelo's statue of David in Florence's Accademia—is attributed to recent government moves to make the management of art heritage autonomous.

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  • Scientists Use Canaletto to Chart Venice's Slide

    Scientists determining how much Venice has sunk into its lagoon in the last few centuries turned to an unusual source for clues—the eighteenth-century Venetian landscapes by Canaletto, reports the Associated Press.

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  • Good News Comes in Twos at AGO

    Billionaire art collector Ken Thomson will donate seventy million Canadian dollars (forty-four million US dollars) in cash and his three-hundred-million-Canadian-dollar (190-million-US-dollar) art collection, including many Canadian masterpieces, to the Art Gallery of Ontario, writes Lisa Rochon in the Toronto Globe and Mail. Frank Gehry will design the 178-million-Canadian-dollar (113-million-US-dollar) reconstruction of the gallery in the neighborhood where he grew up before leaving Canada in 1947 for the United States.

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  • Sotheby's Struggle Continues

    Sotheby's reported a loss of forty-eight million dollars in the third quarter of this year, along with a drop in total revenue compared with the same period last year, writes Georgina Adam in the Art Newspaper.

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