News

  • Taiwanese Government Agrees to Fund Guggenheim

    After weeks of wrangling, the Taiwanese government has agreed to provide funding to Taichung City for the establishment of a branch of the Guggenheim Museum, Ko Shu-ling reports in the Taipei Times. “We'll fund the city 80 percent of the project, but no more than five billion [Taiwanese] dollars [147 million US dollars], under the condition that the city is responsible for the planning, operation, and management of the facility,” Taiwanese Premier Yu Shyi-kun announced on Sunday.

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  • The Barnes Collection: Moving Downtown After All?

    The New York Times' Carol Vogel reports that the Barnes Foundation and its multibillion-dollar collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art are closer than ever to moving from a quiet suburb to downtown Philadelphia, where its neighbors will be the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Rodin Museum. The board of Lincoln University, the institution that nominates four of the five board members of the Barnes, voted Saturday to support the proposed move, although in early September it appeared that differences of opinion between Lincoln University and the Barnes might permanently derail the

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  • Walker Art Center to Close for a Year

    In February 2004, the Walker Art Center's current building will be closed for a year for remodeling, Mary Abbe reports in the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Plans call for the Walker to reopen in spring 2005, when a ninety-million-dollar addition on its south side will be finished.

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  • Lenkiewicz Auction Defies Expectations

    Robert Lenkiewicz, who died in Britain last year at the age of sixty, is perhaps better known for his macabre habits (he once embalmed the body of a tramp and kept it in a secret drawer at his studio) than for his art, which mainly took the form of fairly conventional, if somewhat dark, figurative paintings. But Lenkiewicz's status may be rising, Terry Kirby reports in The Independent. Sotheby's auctioned 155 of his works in London yesterday, and the sale, which was expected to raise about 500,000 pounds (800,000 dollars), brought in almost 800,000 pounds (1.2 million dollars).

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  • Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis Opens Its Doors

    The relocated and expanded Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis will open its doors to the public on September 20 with the inaugural exhibition “A Fiction of Authenticity: Contemporary Africa Abroad,” the St. Louis Business Journal reports. The museum's new 27,000-square-foot building was designed by Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture.

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  • MoCA's Distinguished Women in the Arts Award Goes to Ono

    Yoko Ono, currently in the news for her revival of Cut Piece, will be the recipient of the fifth Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art's Award to Distinguished Women in the Arts. As Art Museum Network News reports, the award was created in 1994 to recognize women who provide leadership in the visual, performing, and literary arts.

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  • House Votes to Increase Funding for Museum Insurance Program

    The New York Times's Carol Vogel reports that the House of Representatives voted on Tuesday evening to raise the federal backing available to American museums through the Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program to eight billion dollars from five billion dollars. Unlike standard commercial insurance, the government indemnity program covers the effects of terrorism both in transit and on site. The program has been flooded with requests from museums trying to organize ambitious international shows at a time when insurance costs have risen as much as 500 percent.

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  • “Lady of Warka” Recovered

    Investigators have recovered the so-called Lady of Warka, one of the most valuable exhibits stolen from the Iraqi National Museum in the chaos during Saddam Hussein's fall, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports. The alabaster sculpture, dating from around 3500 BC, is believed to be one of the earliest artistic representations of the human face.

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  • After Fifteen Years, Scott's Flag Is Still Controversial

    Dread Scott's 1988 installation What is the Proper Way to Display the U.S. Flag?, which invites visitors to walk on an American flag draped on the floor, sparked protests and a denunciation from then-president George Bush when it was first shown in Chicago in 1989. It is currently on view at Nassau Community College on Long Island, where, once again, it has sparked protests and controversy. On Tuesday Scott met with a number of veterans who find the work offensive, and Newsday's Olivia Winslow sat in.

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  • Government Crackdown Spells Trouble for Havana Biennial

    Troubles are mounting for the eighth Havana Biennial as a major sponsor—the Dutch cultural organization the Prince Claus Fund—pulls the plug on funding, citing the Cuban government's recent crackdowns on dissidents. ‘'The fact that they arrested seventy-five intellectuals and activists is why we decided not to fund them,'’ Els van der Plas, director of the fund, told the Miami Herald's Elisa Turner. The biennial is scheduled to open on November 1.

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  • The Andrew Lloyd Webber Museum of Art

    Theater impresario Andrew Lloyd Webber has amassed one of the finest collections of nineteenth-century British art in private hands, encompassing works by Millais, Rosetti, and Burne-Jones (as well as the odd Picasso). The BBC reports that Lloyd Webber recently announced that he would like the paintings to be accessible to the public after his death and is planning to transform his Berkshire estate into a museum.

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  • Battle over David's Bath Rages On

    Brushing off critics who fear the ruin of a masterpiece, restorers are forging ahead with the cleaning of Michelangelo's David, insisting one of the world's most admired statues needs to be more presentable for its five-hundredth birthday next year. At a news conference Monday, reports Frances D'Emilio in the Toronto Star, experts defended their decision to resume the project, which was interrupted when an internationally respected restorer quit rather than follow orders to use a cleaning method she feared could harm the sculpture.

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