News

  • WTC Site Proposal Designs Appraised

    On Tuesday night a lively panel discussion was held on the design proposals for the World Trade Center site, writes Julie Iovine in the New York Times. Most of the architects were present, and the four panelists included Paul Goldberger, the architecture critic for the New Yorker; Richard Kahan, the former chief executive of the Battery Park City Authority; Bernard Tschumi, dean of the architecture school at Columbia University; and Craig Whitaker, an architect and planner.

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  • Carnegie Cuts Provoke Outcry

    People who make, teach, and exhibit film in Pittsburgh were stunned yesterday by the Carnegie Museum of Art's announcement that it was eliminating its venerated film and video department as a way to save money, writes Caroline Abels in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. John Hanhardt, senior curator of film and media arts at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, called Carnegie film and video curator Bill Judson “an extraordinary curator and scholar” who “has done great work with thematic programming that looks at the history of the moving image.”

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  • Cutbacks Announced at Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

    Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh is eliminating its film and video section and permanently laying off seventeen full-time and four part-time employees, writes Patricia Lowry in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh had a combined budget of $53 million dollars in 2002 for its four departments: the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Carnegie Science Center, and the Andy Warhol Museum. The 2003 budget will be about $53 million.

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  • Worth Magazine List Looks East

    Only one Los Angeles organization is on the list of twenty-four arts entities that Worth, a Manhattan-based monthly geared toward the very wealthy, anointed in its December issue as representing “the best of our country's culture”—and therefore worth special consideration for philanthropic giving, notes Mike Boehm in the Los Angeles Times.

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  • Gillian Wearing Apologizes for Guardian Cover

    Turner Prize–winning artist Gillian Wearing apologized last night for her design for the front cover of the Guardian tabloid section, writes David Lister in The Independent. Illustrating an article on reality game shows, Wearing's work consisted of the words FUCK CILLA BLACK in black felt-tip pen, surrounded by white space.

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  • Wearing Cover Design Causes Outcry

    The Guardian's decision to turn over the front page of its features section to internationally renowned British artists has today provoked a flurry of complaints over the use of bad language, writes Ciar Byrne in The Guardian. The decision to commission top artists—Wearing, David Hockney, Antony Gormley, Keith Tyson, and the Chapman brothers—was made more than six months ago. Some of the artists prepared their work in advance, but Wearing came up with her idea after spending a day with The Guardian's features team yesterday.

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  • Arts Funding Will Continue to Drop in 2003

    After ten years of steady growth, fiscal year 2003 legislative appropriations for state arts agencies fell for the second consecutive year, according to an annual survey released Thursday by the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies in Washington, DC, writes Diane Haithman in the Los Angeles Times. According to the study, 62 percent of the decline can be blamed on two states: California and Massachusetts.

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  • New Director for Orange County Museum

    The Orange County Museum of Art has announced that Dennis Szakacs will be its new director, writes Mike Boehm in the Los Angeles Times. Since 1996, Szakacs has been deputy director of New York's New Museum of Contemporary Art; before that, he spent nine months as managing director of P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center.

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  • Recovered Turners Will Go Back on View

    Two paintings by J.M.W. Turner, recovered by gallery officials after having been stolen eight years ago from a display in Frankfurt, Germany, are to go back on display, reports the BBC News. Shade and Darkness: The Evening of the Deluge and Light and Colour (Goethe's Theory): The Morning After the Deluge will be shown at London's Tate Britain from Wednesday on.

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  • Breton Auction Sparks Protest

    When the New York Times reported on December 17 that the contents of André Breton's overstuffed Paris atelier would be dispersed and sold at auction this spring, a network of latter-day Surrealophiles sprung into action with a petition denouncing the very idea as “repugnant,” reports the Boston Globe.

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  • Guggenheim Las Vegas Now Closed

    The Guggenheim Museum has closed the doors of its Las Vegas branch, just fifteen months after it opened, reports the BBC News. The museum closure is part of a radical cost-cutting exercise that has also seen plans for a 950-million-dollar (600-million-pound) plan for a spectacular new museum in New York scrapped.

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  • The Endangered Treasures of Iraq

    With war in Iraq looming, many in the art-historical world are worried about what might be damaged or destroyed, writes Deborah Solomon in the New York Times. Iraq is home to some of the most important landmarks of the Judeo-Christian tradition, including the reputed Garden of Eden and Ur, the birthplace of the patriarch Abraham.

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