News

  • An Unsavory Connection for MoMA?

    Many of the new MoMA's walls were put up by an allegedly mob-connected contractor, Greg B. Smith writes in the Kansas City Star. The firm, Interstate Drywall, has been affiliated with the family of the late John Gotti for years, according to several informants and public documents. About eighteen months ago, Interstate was hired by MoMA's prime contractor to put up walls throughout the museum, MoMA officials said. Museum officials declined to comment on whether they were aware of the issues surrounding Interstate and the mafia before the company was hired or during its work.

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  • Barnes May Move, Says Judge

    The Barnes Foundation gallery, home to priceless works by Matisse, Renoir and dozens of others, can move from suburban Philadelphia to the city's Benjamin Franklin Parkway downtown, a judge ruled today. As Patricia Horn reports in the Philadelphia Inquirer, more than two years after the Barnes board, backed by a $150 million fundraising promise from three charitable foundations, petitioned the court for permission to move the collection, Montgomery County Orphans' Court Judge Stanley Ott agreed that the Barnes needs to relocate to a more-accessible location to avoid going broke.

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  • Royal Academy's New President Will Face Financial Crisis

    The Royal Academy of Arts, the body that has represented Britain's leading artists for more than two hundred years, is facing a grave financial crisis, Vanessa Thorpe writes in The Guardian. Its splendid corridors are riven with talk of plots and bad management, and unless it scores another blockbuster hit with the “Turks” exhibition, to be staged next year, it may have to sell more of its assets. A new president will be elected on Tuesday, in Vatican-style seclusion, inside the academy's stately home, Burlington House in London's Piccadilly. But when the eighty academicians on the general

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  • NYC Budget Cuts Likely to Lead to More Museum Price Hikes

    An upcoming round of city budget cuts has some New York cultural organizations mulling increases in admission fees, David Seifman reports in the New York Post. Many institutions, struggling with declining endowments, donations, and revenue, such as the Brooklyn Museum and El Museo del Barrio, have already raised their prices, while the Metropolitan Museum of Art is upping its suggested donation from $12 to $15 next month. In a meeting last month, the heads of the thirty-four city-owned arts organizations that make up the Cultural Institutions Group were told by Mayor Bloomberg that they'll have

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  • Okwui Enwezor Named Dean at San Francisco Art Institute

    Okwui Enwezor has been named the San Francisco Art Institute's Dean of Academic Affairs. “We're delighted to welcome Okwui Enwezor to lead the San Francisco Art Institute’s academic programs,” says Chris Bratton, president of SFAI. “His impressive work as a curator, writer, and teacher and his international reach make him a good match for SFAI, which has a long-standing commitment to artistic innovation and cultural engagement. His vision of art as a catalyst for dialogue across cultures is a pedagogical vision well-suited to SFAI’s extraordinary history of educating the best and most influential

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  • In Saatchi Dispute, Tate Offers Its Side of the Story

    The Tate has responded to Charles Saatchi’s revelations in the Art Newspaper that he had offered to donate his entire collection to the gallery, Martin Bailey writes. Director Nicholas Serota understood that a loan was being proposed, and that “at no point was there any suggestion that it was being offered as a gift.” He informed his chairman, then David Verey, but the verbal offer was not formally discussed by the trustees.

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  • Professor Takes Potshots at Turner Winner

    The winner of the Turner Prize did not deserve it, his former professor said Wednesday. Barry Adalian's view was that Jeremy Deller had shown no promise in his art classes at Dulwich College, Adam Luck and Dalya Alberge report in The Times (London). “I thought that some of the other contenders were much better,“ said Adalian. ”I think, in particular, his graffiti is a bit passé. It has been done so many times before. That was my immediate reaction."

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  • Stolen Picassos, Rothkos, De Koonings Recovered

    The FBI and police said Wednesday they have recovered some of the more than $2 million in art works stolen from a storage unit in a St. Louis suburb in October, the Kansas City Star reports. The stolen items included paintings, prints and sculptures by Picasso, De Kooning, Rothko, and others. The FBI and police would not disclose the victim's name, nor would they say how they recovered the art, though they did say that half of the more than one hundred missing pieces have not been found.

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  • Louvre Plans an Atlanta Outpost

    The Louvre has announced that it is to open an outpost at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia, in September 2006, Emma Beatty and Daphne Betar report in the Art Newspaper. The two museums have been in discussions since spring and expect to sign an agreement next month. Under the terms of the collaboration, the French museum is to lend hundreds of its works to the High Museum for an indefinite period in return for an undisclosed sum.

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  • Germany Lags Behind Booming Art Market

    Germany, which has held fourth place in the art market over the years after the United States, the United Kingdom and France, now appears to have taken fifth place worldwide in terms of turnover behind Italy, PR Newswire reports. While Italy and Germany ran neck in neck in 2004, so far this year Germany only accounts for 2% of the market compared to 3.6% for its closest rival. Revenue generated at fine art auctions in Italy is up 26.6% on last year's figures, whereas the figure in Germany has contracted by 14.7% due essentially to the effect of lower prices. Germany is one of the only markets

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  • Deller Wins Turner Prize

    A video tour of Texas won British artist Jeremy Deller the Turner Prize, Paul Majendie reports on Reuters. Deller, the favorite with bookmakers, landed the £25,000 ($48,500) first prize by taking viewers on a video tour from Crawford, home to President Bush's ranch, to Waco, site of the Branch Davidian siege. “It's been a not unenjoyable experience,” Deller said after receiving the prize. “It is a very strange event. I must confess it doesn't feel real.”

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  • In Shadow of Miami, What Next for Art Chicago?

    When the cell phones finally stopped ringing, Laura Washington writes in the Chicago Sun Times, the mayor of Miami Beach started cooing about his coup. In just three years, Art Basel Miami Beach has knocked Art Chicago out of the picture. The combination of European snob appeal and sultry climes has made this international art confab “the perfect marriage between Swiss efficiency and Miami Beach excitement,” Miami Beach Mayor David Dermer said Wednesday at the news conference for the four-day extravaganza.

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