News

  • Arts Groups Suffer in Wake of September 11

    Former mayor Rudolph Giuliani urged New Yorkers to go out and enjoy the city's cultural offerings. At the same time, the city started to slash its contributions to nonprofit art organizations. A report due out this month seeks to quantify the loss to the art community.

    Read more
  • MoMA Film Still Archive Heads to Pennsylvania

    Created by MoMA's founder, Alfred Barr, the museum's Film Still Archive is being shipped into storage in Hamlin, Pennsylvania. Originally set to go to MoMA's temporary Queens location, its curator, Mary Corliss, was recently laid off, prompting speculation about bureaucratic infighting at the museum and its ultimate plans for the film department.

    Read more
  • Are ‘Starchitects’ Having All the Fun?

    With a handful of architects now international superstars—Koolhaas, Gehry, Piano, and Foster are increasingly household names—they are receiving the lion's share of commissions for high-profile projects around the world. Is the media attention leaving less well-known though equally talented architects out in the cold?

    Read more
  • New NEA Chief Dead

    Michael P. Hammond, the new chief of the National Endowment for the Arts, was found dead in his home in Washington.

    Read more
  • Was the Pompidou Center Just a Pipe Dream?

    Twenty-five years after it first opened in the heart of Paris, the Pompidou Center—designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers—is clearly a success. But has the unique structure of brightly colored steel pipes and glass lived up to its radical ideals, or has it become a monument to a dead era in Parisian life?

    Read more
  • Is Gerhard Richter Beyond Isms?

    Gerhard Richter has long been known for putting painting through the most trying of paces. Does that place him beyond the stultifying power of the “ism”? Michael Kimmelman visits Richter in his home outside Cologne, Germany, to find out if the famously contradictory antimaster escapes all attempts to corral him.

    Read more
  • David Sylvester's Collection to Go on the Block

    English art critic David Sylvester left a sizable quantity of art when he passed away last year. The collection, which includes an Egyptian sandstone figure dating to 2000 BC, African masks, and works by Willem de Kooning, is expected to fetch close to £1 million at auction next month at Sotheby's.

    Read more