News

  • Boston Arts Groups Survey the Damage

    Bay State arts groups are retrenching as they confront budget shortfalls in the face of a foundering economy, an unstable stock market, and a 62 percent cut to the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the largest reduction to a state arts agency nationwide, writes Mary Jo Palumbo in the Boston Herald.

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  • Al Hirschfeld, Caricaturist, Dies at Ninety-nine

    Al Hirschfeld, whose caricatures captured the vivid personalities of theater people and their performances for more than seventy-five years, died at his home in Manhattan yesterday, writes Richard F. Shepard with Mel Gussow in the New York Times. Hirschfeld was ninety-nine.

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  • The Story of The Scream

    The audacious theft of Edvard Munch's painting The Scream astonished the world nine years ago. In just one minute thieves had lifted the Norwegian masterpiece from the wall of a gallery in Oslo and disappeared, writes Vanessa Thorpe in The Guardian. While it is known that the painting was eventually returned to the National Gallery in May 1994, following a trap set by Scotland Yard it has emerged that the British strategy for finding The Scream stretched the limits of international law and involved meticulous research, false identities, and high risks for two unarmed officers.

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  • Yerba Buena Arts Center Director Resigns

    John Killacky, director of San Francisco's Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, has resigned after six years, writes Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle. He has been named program officer for arts and culture at the San Francisco Foundation.

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  • French Government Encourages Private Arts Sponsorship

    The French government has presented a series of measures aimed at encouraging arts sponsorship and the creation of foundations with the intention of helping France catch up with other countries in this field. The measures will be debated in Parliament during the first half of 2003, writes Éva Bensard in the Art Newspaper. Although initiatives designed to encourage French arts sponsorship have increased over the past few years—as seen by the recent activities of companies such as EDF, LVMII, and Cartier International—France still lags behind.

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  • US Supreme Court: Copyright Protections Extended

    Last week, the US Supreme Court expanded copyright protection for intellectual property another twenty years, in a decision that was actively supported by major corporations in the entertainment industry, writes Edward Rothstein in the New York Times. Opponents of the act, led by Stanford Law School professor Lawrence Lessig, who took on the case pro bono and argued it before the Supreme Court, see this defeat as the first battle in a major war for creativity, openness, and the possibilities of the Internet.

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  • Britain's Export Review Committee Admits Failure

    On the eve of its fiftieth anniversary, the UK’s Export Reviewing Committee has issued a stark warning, writes Martin Bailey in the Art Newspaper. The committee was set up to protect Britain’s heritage by offering museums and galleries the chance to buy major artworks that would otherwise be exported. “Through a lack of funding, the system has failed totally to achieve this objective,” the reviewing committee admits in its annual report.

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  • NY Times Culture Coverage Gets an Update

    Howell Raines, the executive editor of the New York Times, has made it his mission to reinvigorate the paper’s cultural coverage, writes Sridhar Pappu in the New York Observer. In October, he appointed Steven Erlanger as culture editor and then, on January 8, brought back the paper’s biggest culture name, Frank Rich, for a weekly front-page column in the Sunday Arts & Leisure section. Raines has yet to name an Arts & Leisure editor, but sources at the Times say the leading candidate is Jodi Kantor, currently the New York editor for Slate, the Internet magazine.

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  • Julius Held, Art Historian, Dies at Ninety-seven

    Julius Held, an art historian renowned for his studies in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish art and a longtime professor of art history at Barnard College, died on December 22 at his home in Bennington, Vermont, at the age of ninety-seven, writes Ken Johnson in the New York Times. Held was one of the last surviving members of an immensely influential generation of German-trained art historians, including Erwin Panofsky, Max Friedlander, and Millard Meiss.

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  • Disappointing Responses at WTC Site Proposal Forum

    A citywide series of public hearings this week to gauge response to the new designs and guidelines for a memorial to victims of 9/11 attracted little more than a predictable array of single-issue zealots and almost no substantive comments about details of the plans, writes Edward Wyatt in the New York Times. “In the end, it didn't feel like a particularly useful meeting, and that was fairly dispiriting,” said Billie Tsien, the architect who is a director of the development corporation and is on the joint agency task force reviewing the new designs. “Unfortunately the people who have paid attention

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  • British Critic Claims Art “Too Good” For North

    Controversial London-based art critic Brian Sewell claims that art lovers in the North are not sophisticated enough to appreciate a new exhibition of work by CoBrA due to open on Tyneside, reports the BBC News. Sewell, who criticised the Gateshead Angel when it was erected, said London was the “center of the art world in Britain.”

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  • Gulbenkian Prize Attracts Hundreds of Hopefuls

    The long list for the first, hundred-thousand-pound Gulbenkian prize reveals giant new museums and modest community projects slugging it out for the richest arts prize in Britain, writes Maeve Kennedy in The Guardian. The prize is worth almost forty thousand pounds more than any other and was intended to create a buzz in the museum world on a par with the Turner and the Booker prizes in visual arts and literature.

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