News

  • As Spring Sales Approach, Optimism Vies with Wartime Qualms

    Some art dealers have advised clients to horde their treasures and wait out the Iraq war and the global economic slump, but others are optimistic about New York's annual spring auctions. “The very rich have remained very rich and that is our clientele,” Manhattan dealer Howard Zwirner told Reuters reporter Grant McCool. “Serious collectors have somewhat of an addiction and won't turn that off.”

    Read more
  • New NEA Chairman Emphasizes Bipartisanship

    In an interview with Los Angeles Times writer Diane Haithman, Dana Gioia, the new chairman of the NEA, said, “I plan to serve by building a huge new consensus to support the arts. Arts education is not a left or right issue, a Democratic or Republican issue. It's good civic common sense.”

    Read more
  • Privatization a Boon for French Auction Houses

    When the French Parliament threw open the auction business to competition in 2001, ending a centuries-old government monopoly, it seemed certain that the big winners would be Sotheby's and Christie's, Christina Passariello writes in Business Week. But to everyone's surprise, private local dealers such as CalmelsCohen (who will preside over the controversial Breton auction this week) are grabbing the lion's share of the spoils.

    Read more
  • Donations Aid Relocation of Museum of Arts and Design

    New York's Museum of Arts and Design has received two private donations totaling twenty-two million dollars to help fund its new home on Columbus Circle, Wendy Blake reports in Crain's New York Business. Together, the gifts bring the museum past the halfway mark in its fifty-million-dollar campaign for the new building program.

    Read more
  • Rising Costs Discourage Touring Exhibitions

    On top of the other financial pressures facing American art museums, the costs of insuring and shipping art have spiked since the terrorist attacks in 2001, reports Jesse Hamlin in the San Francisco Chronicle. Those higher costs, coming at a time of budget cuts and drops in revenue, are causing some museums to scale back the number of big touring exhibitions they present and the shows they create with borrowed works.

    Read more
  • Commission Clears Way for African-American Museum

    A presidential commission submitted plans to Congress Wednesday for a museum of African-American history and culture on the National Mall, Heather Greenfield writes in the Washington Post. The commission's report clears the way for members of Congress to introduce legislation approving the site and authorizing funding to build the 350,000-square-foot museum.

    Read more
  • Australia Cuts Back on Cultural Funding

    The Australian government will trim the funding of institutions such as the National Museum and National Archives by revoking their ability to claim depreciation on their collections in the federal budget, Annabel Crabb reports in The Age. A recent review of fifteen publicly funded cultural institutions found that they receive seventy-five million Australian dollars (forty-five million US dollars) a year toward the offsetting of depreciation costs.

    Read more
  • Protests Fail to Save Breton's Apartment

    Despite more than thirty years of campaigning by leading European artists and writers, removal workers have emptied André Breton's Paris apartment, Paul Webster reports in The Guardian. Breton's art collection and archives are set to be sold at auction next week, and a street protest is planned for the day of the event.

    Read more
  • Beck's Futures Finalists Announced

    On Tuesday, Philip Dodd, the director of London's Institute of Contemporary Art, announced the nine finalists for the annual 56,000-pound (88,000-dollar) Beck's Futures prize, Louise Jury reports in The Independent. Dodd said that the finalists—who include Carey Young, Nick Crowe, and Lucy Skaer—represent a new generation of artists whose sensibility stands in sharp contrast to that of the YBAs.

    Read more
  • A “Dire Situation” for South Africa's Museums

    The South Africa Sunday Times reports that Rooksana Omar, president of the South African Museum Association, warned government officials last week that the country's museums are “in a dire situation.” She identified lack of funding as a central problem and said it was becoming difficult for South Africa's museums to retain their collections and artworks.

    Read more
  • Museum's New Facade May Spark Debate

    The Museum of Arts and Design plans to reclad 2 Columbus Circle—an abandoned work of romantic modernism that has irritated and amused New Yorkers for thirty-nine years—in a scrim of bright terra cotta. The plan will almost surely set off a contentious public review, David W. Dunlap writes in the New York Times.

    Read more
  • Chapmans Take Liberties with Rare Goya Etchings

    Jake and Dinos Chapman have “vandalized” a rare edition of Goya's “Disasters of War,” Fiachra Gibbons reports in The Guardian. In a move guaranteed to cause outrage within the art establishment, the Chapman brothers have drawn demonic clown and puppy heads on many of the figures in a set of eighty etchings produced from Goya's own plates.

    Read more