News

  • Documenta Set to Open

    The international art world is packing its bags for next weekend's grand opening of Documenta11. Documenta is not this year's only group show, but Kassel is definitely Rendezvous 2002 for museum directors, curators, dealers, gallerists, and collectors. They will be there because everyone will be there.

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  • What Documenta Means

    On the eve of Documenta11, Steven Henry Madoff surveyed some of today's best-known artists—among them Richard Serra, Cady Noland, Guillermo Kuitca, Barbara Kruger, and Jeff Wall—to ask them what the quinquennial exhibition has meant for them.

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  • Giacometti Sculpture Stolen from Hamburger Kunsthalle

    An Giacometti sculpture valued at nearly half a million dollars was stolen from the Hamburger Kunsthalle on May 25, city police reported today. The piece, which was replaced by the thieves with a wooden replica, was taken during a special evening opening of museums across Hamburg, during which approximately 16,000 museumgoers visited the Kunsthalle.

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  • Who is Lucian Freud?

    Next month, Tate Britain launches a major retrospective of the work of our Lucian Freud. Here, John Walsh profiles the most enigmatic of artists.

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  • New Chief at Tate Modern

    The Tate Modern announced yesterday that Vicente Todoli, the Spanish founding director of the acclaimed new Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art in Porto, Portugal, will take over as director at the converted power station. The job has been open since founding director Lars Nittve left a year ago to head the national museum in his native Sweden. Todoli will join the museum in January, after creating his final exhibition at Porto, on the work of Francis Bacon, which includes several loans from the Tate collection.

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  • Turner Shortlist Announced

    The ever-controversial Turner Prize shortlist was announced. This year's nominees are Fiona Banner, Liam Gillick, Keith Tyson, and Catherine Yass—all British-born who represent a wide range of work across different media.

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  • Art Thieves Expose Small Museum Vulnerabilities

    The administrators of the Château de Blois are still shaken by what happened on July 19, 1996. At the height of the tourist season, with more than two thousand daily visitors to the medieval château and its museum of fine arts, a small sixteenth-century portrait was removed from an ornate frame and disappeared. It was the museum's first such loss in memory, and it exposed weaknesses in the château's security.

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  • The Art of the Genome

    If art in the broadest sense peers into the mysteries of life, then an art dedicated to the structure of life itself is of momentous relevance. That imposing premise informs “Gene(sis): Contemporary Art Explores Human Genomics,” an exhibition that opened in April at the University of Washington's Henry Art Gallery in Seattle. At once clever and awkward, the show's title evokes the biblical loftiness of Divine Origin and an altogether cooler scrutiny of the scientific, ethical, and legal issues pulsing from the very nucleus of our genetic being.

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  • Rome Builds Again

    Buildings by Renzo Piano, Richard Meier, Zaha Hadid, and others are starting to slowly transform Rome. But does this mean that the ancient capital is in the midst of “Los Angelization,” as some Roman architecture students are claiming?

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  • The Post-exhibition Biennial?

    What is Manifesta? According to the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung's Thomas Wagner, the fourth installment of the movable biennial is a “relationship machine,” an open, networked field of art, a terrain of rapprochement and examination. Video, performance, photography, assemblage, installation—what is shown here is art after the disintegration of all genres and borders, art products from the present day's conveyor belt—medial, networked, young.

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  • For the Love of Art

    In the latest twist to a case that has left the art world reeling, Stephane Breitwieser, who was arrested in the Swiss city of Lucerne last November after stealing a bugle from a museum, told police his six-year spree was driven by a love of art rather than a desire to make money. The thirty-one-year-old French waiter has confessed to stealing 239 art treasures worth tens of millions of dollars from 172 museums and antique shops in seven European countries, prosecutors said yesterday.

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