News

  • Bruce D. Kurtz, Curator and Critic, Dies at Fifty-Nine

    Bruce D. Kurtz, an influential art critic and curator who explored the complex intersection of high art and popular culture and was an early champion of video art, died Saturday in Phoenix of complications from AIDS, Christopher Knight writes in the Los Angeles Times. He was fifty-nine.

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  • Liverpool Biennial Hits the Jackpot

    The Baltic Centre in Gateshead, the Liverpool Biennial, and the Wordsworth Trust in Cumbria were among the winners of a 1.6-billion-pound (2.5-billion-dollar) grant aimed at rewarding excellence in the arts in the UK, Louise Jury reports in The Independent. Widespread praise for the Liverpool Biennial secured an increase in funding of more than 970 percent, from 35,000 pounds (55,000 dollars) this year to 376,664 pounds (592,000 dollars) by 2005–2006, while the Baltic Centre won a 207 percent increase over the next two years to 815,225 pounds (868,000 dollars).

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  • Nationwide Trend Toward Arts Programs for At-Risk Youth

    Across the country, youth-corrections officials are turning to the arts to improve behavior within the corrections system and to prevent new admissions from outside, Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz reports in the Boston Globe. A report published in May 2001 by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the National Endowment for the Arts encouraged the trend.

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  • In Uncertain Times, Investors May Be Turning to Art

    While it would be an overstatement to claim that a stream of funds is flowing out of savings and into the auction rooms, there is anecdotal evidence that more investors are putting their money into art, writes Martin Vander Weyer in The Telegraph.

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  • At Least Half of NJ's Slashed Arts Funding Will Be Restored

    New Jersey's arts community has been the squeaky wheel that persuaded officials to put its money back in the state's bare-bones budget, Kathy Hennessy reports in Newsday. Governor James E. McGreevey said he will press lawmakers to restore at least half of the eighteen million dollars slashed from arts programs statewide in the proposed budget.

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  • Wadsworth Atheneum Names New Director

    Willard J. Holmes, 54, will be the new director of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Tom Condon reports in the Hartford Courant. Holmes has been deputy director and chief operating officer of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City since 1994.

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  • Major Contemporary-Art Space to Open in Seattle

    Gulf Oil heirs and art collectors Ruth and Bill True will open a major contemporary-art space in Seattle this fall, writes Regina Hackett in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. The Trues' art center probably will be known as the Western Bridge, said Eric Frederickson, former art critic of The Stranger and director-to-be of the space.

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  • California African American Museum Reopens

    The California African American Museum reopened Saturday after a 3.8-million-dollar renovation that kept the doors closed for eighteen months, Suzanne Muchnic reports in the Los Angeles Times. The museum has presented many critically acclaimed exhibitions, but its dependence on fluctuating state funding has kept it off balance.

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  • National Gallery's Atrium Gets a Makeover

    To commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of I.M. Pei's East Building, the National Gallery of Art in Washington will take down the Miró tapestry that hangs on an immense wall in the building's atrium and put up Ellsworth Kelly's Color Panels for a Large Wall, Carol Vogel reports in the New York Times. “The atrium was looking very dated,” said Jeffrey Weiss, the curator of modern and contemporary art.

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  • Scholars Plead for Safety of Iraq's National Museum

    In a plea published in Friday's Science magazine, leading scholars begged armies and governments to safeguard as many Iraqi archaeological sites as possible and to shut off the major looting of antiquities that is already under way. Most in need of protection is the Iraq National Museum in Baghdad, Robert Cooke reports in Newsday, plus the museum in Mosul.

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  • DC Officials See Arts Funding as Antidote to Fiscal Woes

    Washington, DC, officials are coping with a 128-million-dollar revenue shortfall in their 2003 budget, Sean Madigan writes in the Washington Business Journal. Members of Mayor Tony Williams's administration argue that a thriving arts scene would spur the city's economic development, and they are seeking funding for a program that would funnel seventy-five million dollars to the DC arts community.

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  • Tate's Masterpieces Will Travel Thanks to Grant

    Masterpieces from the Tate collection will be loaned to regional museums in the UK through a scheme funded by a 440,000-pound (688,000-dollar) lottery grant announced yesterday, Maeve Kennedy writes in The Guardian. Tate Britain's director, Stephen Deuchar, described the loan program as vital to his determination to increase access to the Tate's vast collections.

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