News

  • National Gallery's Atrium Gets a Makeover

    To commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of I.M. Pei's East Building, the National Gallery of Art in Washington will take down the Miró tapestry that hangs on an immense wall in the building's atrium and put up Ellsworth Kelly's Color Panels for a Large Wall, Carol Vogel reports in the New York Times. “The atrium was looking very dated,” said Jeffrey Weiss, the curator of modern and contemporary art.

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  • Scholars Plead for Safety of Iraq's National Museum

    In a plea published in Friday's Science magazine, leading scholars begged armies and governments to safeguard as many Iraqi archaeological sites as possible and to shut off the major looting of antiquities that is already under way. Most in need of protection is the Iraq National Museum in Baghdad, Robert Cooke reports in Newsday, plus the museum in Mosul.

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  • DC Officials See Arts Funding as Antidote to Fiscal Woes

    Washington, DC, officials are coping with a 128-million-dollar revenue shortfall in their 2003 budget, Sean Madigan writes in the Washington Business Journal. Members of Mayor Tony Williams's administration argue that a thriving arts scene would spur the city's economic development, and they are seeking funding for a program that would funnel seventy-five million dollars to the DC arts community.

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  • Tate's Masterpieces Will Travel Thanks to Grant

    Masterpieces from the Tate collection will be loaned to regional museums in the UK through a scheme funded by a 440,000-pound (688,000-dollar) lottery grant announced yesterday, Maeve Kennedy writes in The Guardian. Tate Britain's director, Stephen Deuchar, described the loan program as vital to his determination to increase access to the Tate's vast collections.

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  • In Ohio, Three Major Museums Plan to Expand

    Three major Ohio art museums—the Akron Art Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Toledo Museum of Art—are forging ahead with ambitious expansion and renovation plans despite the current political and economic climate, Steven Litt reports in the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

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  • Rediscovered Constable Drawings Set Record at Auction

    Three long-lost drawings by John Constable set a record for the artist when they sold at auction in London on Wednesday for 352,160 pounds (547,000 dollars)—almost seven times the combined estimate, writes Martin Hickman in The Independent.

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  • Federal Prosecutors File Suit Against Gallery

    In a civil lawsuit filed in US District Court in Manhattan, federal prosecutors accused Lawrence Gagosian, Gagosian Gallery, and three other men of failing to pay taxes on the sale of fifty-eight works of art that earned seventeen million dollars in taxable gains, the New York Times reports. Gagosian's activities came under scrutiny when ImClone Systems founder Sam Waksal pleaded guilty this month to avoiding sales taxes on art purchased from the gallery.

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  • Jack Goldstein, Post-Pop Pioneer, Dies at Fifty-Seven

    Jack Goldstein, an artist whose performances, short films, paintings, and sound pieces of the late 1970s and early '80s helped define the early stages of postmodernist art, died on Friday at his home in San Bernardino, writes Roberta Smith in the New York Times. Goldstein, who had struggled for many years to overcome drug dependency and depression, committed suicide, said Brian Butler, the Los Angeles art dealer who represented him. He was fifty-seven.

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  • In Miami, Plans for Museum Stir Debate

    When prominent South Florida developer and art collector Marty Margulies hosts a ‘'town meeting'’ to discuss the “fiscal responsibility” of building a new art museum in downtown Miami, at least one chair will be empty—that of Suzanne Delehanty, director of the Miami Art Museum. In an exchange of letters initiated by the museum, MAM board president Susana Ibargüen, trustee Rose Ellen Meyerhoff Greene, and Delehanty wrote, “Please remove Suzanne Delehanty's name, title, and affiliation from all printed matter and media materials you are preparing for this program.” Margulies retorted, “This

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  • Collector and Philanthropist Carmen Kreeger Dies

    Carmen M. Kreeger, the philanthropist who with her husband, Geico insurance company founder David Lloyd Kreeger, amassed an extensive art collection that became the basis for the Kreeger Museum, died of congestive heart failure March 10 at her home in Chevy Chase, Maryland, the Washington Post reports. She was ninety-four. The Kreegers were major supporters of many arts organizations, including the Corcoran Gallery. They began buying art in the 1950s and built a collection that included works by Picasso, van Gogh, Monet, Braque, Sisley, Chagall, Dubuffet, and Miró as well as modern works and

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  • Russian Prosecutor Tries to Halt Repatriation of Trophy Art

    A senior Russian prosecutor ordered the Culture Ministry not to repatriate a large collection of artworks taken from Germany by the Soviet army in 1945, the Moscow Times reports. First Deputy Prosecutor General Yury Biryukov's order came just days after Culture Minister Mikhail Shvydkoi rejected fierce criticism from lawmakers and insisted the artworks, taken from the Bremen Kunsthalle, were “trophy art” and must be returned to Germany.

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  • A Case for the Arts as Economic Force

    Facing a potential funding squeeze, Silicon Valley's arts community is launching a lobbying campaign hoping to show that the arts are more than a cultural experience—they are an economic engine for the region. A six-page economic report prepared by AMH Consultants and presented to the San Jose Arts Commission last week details how spending at artistic events stimulates the local economy, David A. Sylvester writes in the San Jose Mercury News. Studying the economic benefits of the arts represents a shift in thinking. “People don't stop and think of the arts as an important piece of the economy,”

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