News

  • A Few Ideas on Paper for WTC Site

    In June, a group of New York architects met to discuss their dissatisfaction with the planning process for the World Trade Center site as conducted by the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, writes Herbert Muschamp. The New York Times Magazine offered them the opportunity to present what Muschamp describes as a “study project” for rebuilding.

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  • Resale Royalties for Australian Artists?

    The Australian government may pass a royalties law for the resale of artwork, reports the Sydney Morning Herald. The legislation would be similar to the droit de suite in France, under which artists get 5 percent of each resale. Last year the droit de suite was adopted as European Union policy, to be put in place across the continent within five years.

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  • Upon Repatriation, Artifacts Found to be Toxic

    As late as the 1960s, museums and collectors preserved artifacts by applying toxic pesticides, including mercury, arsenic, and the now-banned DDT, writes Matt Palmquist of the San Francisco Weekly. In the wake of a federal repatriation law passed in the early 1990s, Native Americans have realized what was previously known only to museum workers: Virtually every organic artifact collected before the second half of the twentieth century has been contaminated.

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  • In Turmoil, Barnes Foundation Reaches Eightieth Year

    Inside the Barnes Foundation near Philadelphia is one of the world's most spectacular art collections, writes David Zucchino of the Los Angeles Times. But, on its eightieth anniversary, the institution remains burdened by years of confrontation over art, education, and race.

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  • Collecting and Preserving September 11

    Over the last twelve months, historians, curators, and archivists from New York institutions have collected artifacts from September 11, writes Glenn Collins of the New York Times. “These objects have been touched by history,” said Dr. Kenneth T. Jackson, president of the New-York Historical Society, whose staff visited the World Trade Center site and the Fresh Kills landfill in the weeks following the attack.

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  • Marfa Artist-in-Residence Touches a Nerve

    Though Icelandic artist Hlynur Hallsson arrived this summer in Marfa, Texas, with plans to stimulate discussion, his new work has created an uproar, writes Jim Yardley of the New York Times.“The real axis of evil [sic] are Israel, USA and the UK,” Hallsson wrote, grafitti-style, on a wall in English and Spanish. “Ariel Sharon is the top terrorist. George W. Bush is an idiot.”

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